CAA News Today

Announcing the 2023 Distinguished Scholar

posted by November 15, 2022

We are delighted to announce the Distinguished Scholar Session at the 111th CAA Annual Conference will honor Edward J. Sullivan. This session will highlight his career and provide an opportunity for dialogue between and among colleagues. This event will be held in-person at the New York Hilton Midtown during the 111th Annual Conference, February 16, 2022 at 4:30–6:00 pm.

Established in 2001, the Distinguished Scholar Session illuminates and celebrates the contributions of senior art historians. The Annual Conference Committee identifies a distinguished scholar each year who then invites a group of colleagues to create the session. The honoree’s involvement is fundamental to the series, which has become a tradition that gives voice to the continuities and ruptures that have shaped art-historical scholarship from the twentieth century into the new millennium.

Access to this program requires registration and is included with an All Access–level registration. Recordings will be accessible to registrants after the event. Register here.

Sullivan’s work has been transformative for the field of art history, especially in relation to the study and elevation of Latin American and Caribbean, Latina/o/x art and artists, and for the advancement of women and the BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ communities in these regions.

Edward J. Sullivan is the Helen Gould Shepard Professor in the History of Art at New York University (Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History). Since receiving his PhD from NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts in 1979 (with a dissertation on painting in Madrid after the death of Velázquez) he has taught at Hunter College, Williams College, the University of Miami, and Trinity College, Dublin. However, his service as professor and administrator at New York University has been the defining aspect of his professional career. Sullivan has mentored hundreds of students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. His fields of research and teaching focus on a wide variety of geographical and temporal areas from Viceregal art in the Americas and the Philippines, to nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century art in Mexico, Central and South America, the United States, and the Caribbean. Sullivan has also had a parallel career as an independent curator and has worked on exhibitions in museums and cultural institutions throughout the US, Latin America, and Europe. He is the author of more than thirty books and exhibition catalogs, among which are The Language of Objects in the Art of the Americas (Yale University Press, 2007), Fragile Demon: Juan Soriano in Mexico 1935–1950 (Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2008), Continental Shifts: The Art of Edouard Duval Carrié (Haitian Cultural Institute 2008), Nueva York 1613–1945 (Scala Books, 2010), From San Juan to Paris and Back: Francisco Oller and Caribbean Art in the Era of impressionism (Yale University Press, 2014), Making the Americas Modern: Hemispheric Art 1910–1960 (Laurence King, 2018), and Brazilian Modern: The Living Art of Roberto Burle Marx (New York Botanical Garden, 2018).

The panel will include Ilona Katzew (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), Estrellita Brodsky (Another Space), Sean Nesselrode-Moncada (Rhode Island School of Design), Joseph Shaikewitz (Institute of Fine Arts), and Lynda Klich (City University of New York, Hunter College) as moderator.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Awards

Filmed at the National Museum of Mexican Art, this program features a discussion about mentoring between two Chicago-based artists, Rubén Aguirre and Dan Ramirez, mediated by Cesáreo Moreno, Director and Curator of the National Museum of Mexican Art. Their conversation takes place inside the Aguirre’s exhibition Tectonic Reflections, open at the National Museum of Mexican Art until July 24. This program was a part of the session, “Mentoring Beyond the Classroom: The Continuing Relationship Over Time,” at CAA’s 2022 Annual Conference in February, chaired by Richard Serrano, a member of CAA’s Services to Artists Committee.

Distinguished Scholar, Kirsten P. Buick

posted by April 14, 2022

On February 17, 2022, Kirsten P. Buick was featured as the Distinguished Scholar at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference. The Distinguished Scholar session highlighted her career and provided an opportunity for dialogue between and among colleagues. Moderated by Annual Conference Chair, Theresa Avila, the session also featured presentations by a few of Buick’s students, including Shana Klein, Abbey Hepner, Annette M. Rodriguez, and Emmanuel Ortega. Watch the session in full below!

Established in 2001, the Distinguished Scholar Session illuminates and celebrates the contributions of senior art historians. The Annual Conference Committee identifies the distinguished scholar each year and each session typically brings together the distinguished scholar and a group of colleagues. The honoree’s involvement is fundamental to the series as a way of demonstrating a living tradition that gives voice to the continuities and ruptures that have shaped art-historical scholarship from the twentieth century into the new millennium.

We are inviting nominations for next year’s Distinguished Scholar at CAA’s 2023 Annual Conference in New York. Nominate individuals here!


On her career, Buick explains:

I identify as a scholar of the visual and material culture of the first British Empire, and the British diaspora in the US, Caribbean, and India. My teaching encompasses topics such as surveys of British Colonial and U.S. Art, American Landscape representation, African American Art, Pro- and Anti-Abolitionist Images in the Atlantic World; and seminars such as Photographing Jim Crow, 1890-1965, Patronizing Women: Taste and Collecting in the 19th and 20th Centuries, and The Victorian Nude: Representing Women, Men, Intersex, and Children. My research and teaching interests encompass histories of science, medicine, religion, as well as monuments, and the use of public space. Increasingly, I am interested in the racialization of mobility—what I characterize as critical mobility studies. I publish primarily in the realm of the history of African American art and its roots in US cultural formations. My first book, “Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject,” is a good example of how I wed my teaching and publication imperatives together with my challenge to art history and visual studies to be more and to do better. Ultimately, teaching is my passion; and I tell my students that job # 1 is surviving the damage, and job # 2 is to never concede the center. 

Kirsten Pai Buick is a professor of art history at the University of New Mexico. She received her Ph.D. in art history from the University of Michigan and was a SAAM Predoctoral Fellow and a Charles Gaius Bolin Fellow at Williams College. Buick is a recipient of the David C. Driskell Prize for African American Art and has published extensively on African American art, including her book Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject (Duke Univ. Press, 2010). Her second book, In Authenticity: “Kara Walker” and the Eidetics of Racism, is in progress.  

Filed under: Annual Conference, Event

Annual Artist Interview, Willie Cole

posted by April 05, 2022

On February 18, 2022, Willie Cole was featured in the Annual Artists’ Interviews at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference. Watch the interview in full below!

Beginning in 1997, the Annual Artists’ Interviews were established to provide the opportunity for esteemed artists to have one-on-one conversations with colleagues at the Annual Conference. Each year, the Services to Artists Committee (SAC) identifies two distinguished artists to participate.  The interviews are held annually as part of the Services to Artists Program at the conference.

 


 

Willie Cole is a contemporary American sculptor, printer, and perceptual engineer. His work uses contexts of postmodern eclecticism, and combines references and appropriation from African and African American imagery. Cole is best known for his Dada and Surrealist readymades, which assemble and transform ordinary domestic and used objects such as irons, ironing boards, high-heeled shoes, hair dryers, bicycle parts, wooden matches, lawn jockeys, and other discarded appliances and hardware. Cole grew up in Newark, NJ. He attended the Boston University School of Fine Arts, received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 1976, and continued his studies at the Art Students League of New York from 1976 to 1979.  

Recent exhibitions of Cole’s work include To Reclaim, Kavi Gupta, Chicago, IL, USA; New Concepts in Printmaking 2: Willie Cole, MoMA, New York, NY, USA; Reconfiguring an African Icon: Odes to the Mask by Modern and Contemporary Artists from Three Continents, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, USA; Chicago, Surrealism: The Conjured Life, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL, USA; and Afro: Black Identity in America and Brazil, Tamarind Institute, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Cole’s work is in the permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; MoMA, New York, NY; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; and many others. 

Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists

Annual Artist Interview, Jessica Stockholder

posted by March 28, 2022

Jessica Stockholder, Assist: Sidled, 2016 (Photograph © Jessica Stockholder)

On February 18, 2022, Jessica Stockholder was featured in the Annual Artists’ Interviews at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference, interviewed by Christine Mehring. See below to watch the interview in full!

Beginning in 1997, the Annual Artists’ Interviews were established to provide the opportunity for esteemed artists to have one-on-one conversations with colleagues at the Annual Conference. Each year, the Services to Artists Committee (SAC) identifies two distinguished artists to participate.  The interviews are held annually as part of the Services to Artists Program at the conference.

 


 

Jessica Stockholder is an internationally acclaimed visual artist and educator who lives and works in Chicago. In addition to earning her BFA from the University of Victoria in Canada and her MFA from Yale University, she was awarded two honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees: one from Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2010, and one from Columbia College in 2013. Stockholder was Elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2018.  

Stockholder’s works sit at the intersection of painting with sculpture, and often incorporate the architecture in which it has been conceivedEmploying a wide range of ordinary everyday materials Stockholder orchestrates an intersection of pictorial and physical space. She probes how meaning derives from physicality, and engages the sensuality and pleasure evoked by color and formal order in an effort to call attention to the edges of understanding.  

Stockholder’s work has been exhibited in many of the world’s most influential art venues, including Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Venice Biennale. It is included in such museum collections as the Art Institute of Chicago, Whitney Museum of American Art, LACMA, and Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.  

Stockholder is currently the Raymond W. & Martha Hilpert Gruner Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Chicago, a position she accepted in 2011, after 12 years as Director of the Sculpture Department at the Yale School of Art.  

Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists

CAA’s 109th Annual Business Meeting Minutes

posted by February 11, 2022

COLLEGE ART ASSOCIATION
109TH ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2021 2:00 P.M. EST

MINUTES

  1. Call to Order/Opening Remarks
    1. President Elizabeth Schlatter called the meeting to order at 2:02 p.m. EST. She thanked the staff for their enormous efforts. She then acknowledged the diverse people linked to the land on which she works and lives, particularly those who have been displaced from that land.
  2. Executive Director’s Report
    1. Meme Omogbai offered a reflection on the importance of this conference. It is amazing we were able to offer the extensive content we did during a pandemic, specifically:
      1. 365 sessions, over 1100 individual presentations in addition to a book and trade fair.  Intersectionality between the visual arts, climate change, eco-feminism, and many other topics.
      2. The virtual format of the conference has offered a new level of access. Content is available across the world and for a month after the conference.
    2. The conference will serve as an important turning point in the history of CAA toward achieving the four pillars of its Strategic Repositioning:
      1. Long term sustainability of the organization through attention to meeting the needs of all segments of our constituency and maximizing the value of membership
      2. Social Entrepreneurship and e-commerce
      3. Technological infrastructure towards a digital transformation to ensure effective and efficient operations and delivery of content
      4. Robust development activities
  3. Approval of the minutes from the February 2020 annual meeting.    
  4. Approval of Minutes of 108th Annual Business Meeting, held in two parts, February 12, and February 14, 2020  
    1. Jaqueline Francis moved; Laura Anderson Barbata seconded. The minutes were approved unanimously.
  5. Financial report
    1. CFO Bob Tofolo reported on the following items:
      1. The association posted a breakeven operating budget for FY20.
      2. The association continues to operate under a break-even budget for FY21. This includes $3.3M in current expenses against equivalent revenue.
      3. A PPP loan of $372,000 was awarded to CAA. That loan was subsequently forgiven last December.
      4. The endowment market value on June 30, 2020 was $9.825M vs prior year of $9.6M
      5. Member count for this year vs. last: As of June 30, 2020, there were 6,699 (7,773, -14%) individual members. There were 443 (464) organizational members and an additional 586 (617, -5%) subscribers to The Art Bulletin and/or Art Journal through our co-publisher Taylor and Francis. These numbers are not exactly comparative as prior year memberships reflect exaggerated increases due to discounts that are absent this year.
      6. 3938 registered attendees at the conference as of this morning. It is expected to be over 4000 by tomorrow.
      7. Question (posed by a member in attendance): how did numbers compare to the last NYC conference? 2019 attendance was over 5000, but the numbers from this year’s count include registrations for Free and Open sessions which we would not have tracked in prior years so some additional work needs to be done so that we can compare apples to apples.
  6. New Business
    1. The following question was posed by a member in attendance: Considering technical issues that have emerged this year, will CAA be evaluating Confex and considering whether they are the best vendor to use moving forward? Elizabeth indicated that the organization would be evaluating all aspects of the conference, including the platform. Meme added that in the midst of this digital transformation, there will be a consolidation of different systems that will address some of the issues that emerged. She encouraged people to fill out the conference surveys that are being administered.
  7. Results of Election of New Directors 
    1. Elizabeth announced the newly elected CAA Board Members:
      1. Roland Betancourt
      2. Lara Evans
      3. Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz
      4. Kelly Walters
      5. Kelvin Parnell Jr. (Emerging Professional)
  8. Adjournment
    1. The meeting was adjourned at 2:25 p.m. EST.

Respectfully submitted by Colin Blakely, Secretary.

CAA’s 110th Annual Business Meeting Agenda

posted by February 11, 2022

CAA Annual Business Meeting Agenda
Friday, February 18, 2022
1 p.m. CT 

The 110th Annual Business Meeting of the members of the College Art Association will be called to order at 1 p.m. CT on Friday, February 18 at the 2022 Annual Conference. Access to this meeting is included in paid registration and can also be accessed by registering for ”No-cost registration”. Once you have registered, please log into the online conference schedule to attend the meeting.

CAA President, N. Elizabeth Schlatter will preside.

  1. Welcome + Call to Order – N. Elizabeth Schlatter, CAA President
  2. Executive Director’s Report Meme Omogbai, CAA Executive Director + CEO 
  3. Approval of Minutes of 109th Annual Business Meeting [ACTION ITEM]
  4. Financial Report – Georgia Harrell, CAA Treasurer + Robert Tofolo, CAA Head of Operations
  5. Old/New Business
  6. Board Member Election Results – N. Elizabeth Schlatter, CAA President
  7. Adjourn

Proxies

If you are unable to attend the Annual Business Meeting, kindly complete a proxy online to appoint the individuals named thereon to (i) vote, as directed by you, for directors, and, at their discretion, on such other matters as may properly come before the Annual Business Meeting; and (ii) vote on any and all adjournments thereof. A proxy, with your vote for directors, must be received no later than 5 p.m. CT Thursday, February 17th, 2022.

Next Meeting – 2023 

The 111th Annual Business Meeting of the College Art Association will be held in New York in 2023, precise date to be announced.

 

 

Digital Humanities at the 110th Annual Conference

posted by February 03, 2022

The upcoming Annual Conference this winter and spring will feature a number of sessions that discuss issues related to the digital humanities and art. See below for links to explore sessions that relate to these topics in the conference schedule.

See the rest of this year’s conference schedule online! Register for CAA’s upcoming conference and learn more at our registration page. After you register, sign into the app and create your own custom schedule using the tools and filtering options on the side (switch time zones in the upper left of the app: CST for in-person and your own time zone for virtual).


 

Sessions on Digital Humanities

 

Critical Cataloging Conversations in Teaching, Research, and Practice
VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION (VRA)
Friday, February 18, 2022
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST)
Bridget Madden, University of Chicago

Dismantling the Patriarchal Canon: Foregrounding Women Artists and Patrons through Digital Art History
DIGITAL ART HISTORY SOCIETY
Friday, March 4, 2022
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST)
Tracy Chapman Hamilton
Dana Hogan, Duke University
Mariah Proctor-Tiffany, California State University, Long Beach

Archival Imaginaries and Futurities in Contemporary Art from SWANA
Saturday, February 19, 2022
4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Lara Fresko Madra, Cornell University
Kareem Estefan, Brown University

New frontiers: creating, collecting, preserving and displaying digital based art of Russia and Eastern Europe
Saturday, February 19, 2022
4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Natalia Kolodzei, Kolodzei Art Foundation

The Living Catalogue Raisonné
CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ SCHOLARS ASSOCIATION
Saturday, February 19, 2022
9:00 a.m.– 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST)
Joan Pachner
Marin R Sullivan, Sculptural Things


 

Sessions on Digital Media

 

Digital Realms in Practice
Thursday, February 17, 2022
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Diverse Resources for New Media
Thursday, February 17, 2022
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Nadav Assor, Connecticut College

New frontiers: creating, collecting, preserving and displaying digital based art of Russia and Eastern Europe
Saturday, February 19, 2022
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Natalia Kolodzei
Kolodzei Art Foundation

Making Media Social: An Examination of Video and Television in the History of Political Activism of the 1970s
Thursday, February 17, 2022
9:00 a.m.– 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST)
Corinna Kirsch, Stony Brook University
Brock Lownes, Stony Brook University

The Problem of Mapping Social Justice On The Social (Creative) Body In an Era Of NFT’s
Saturday, March 5, 2022
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST)
Gale Elston, CUNY

(inappropriate) digital intimacies
Saturday, March 5, 2022
2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. EST)
Francesca Balboni, University of Texas at Austin

Filed under: Annual Conference

CAA offers Annual Conference support grants to graduate students in art history and to international artists and scholars. Meet this year’s recipients of our named support grants and find information about their presentations at the conference and their corresponding session below. Dozens of other support grants were given to CAA members through the Presidents Council of CAA and the “Pay it Forward” initiative.


CAA TRAVEL GRANT IN MEMORY OF ARCHIBALD CASON EDWARDS, SENIOR, AND SARAH STANLEY GORDON EDWARDS

The CAA Support Grant in Memory of Archibald Cason Edwards, Senior, and Sarah Stanley Gordon Edwards was made possible by Mary D. Edwards. The grant supports women who are emerging scholars at either an advanced stage of pursuing a doctoral degree or who have received their PhD within the two years prior to the submission of the application.

 

Kristan Hanson, Dumbarton Oaks
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Nurturing Growth: Eva Gonzalès’s La Plante favorite and Berthe Morisot’s Fillette aux jacinthes”
Session: Enchanted by Nature: Picturing Gendered Plants and Female Agency in Europe and China (17th – 19th Century)

Kristan M. Hanson is an art historian and plant humanist. Her research examines the historical significance of individual plants and botanical forms in art to deepen understandings of human/plant interactions and anthropogenic environmental change. She currently holds a consultancy as Managing Digital Editor for the Plant Humanities Initiative at Dumbarton Oaks, prior to which she was a 2020–2021 academic year fellow. Hanson has also received fellowships and awards to support her research from the Oak Spring Garden Foundation, HASTAC Scholars program, Hall Center for the Humanities, and Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities.

 

Cynthia Kok, Yale University
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “’Een bloempoth van parlemoer’: Painting Life in Dirck van Rijswijck’s Mother-of-Pearl Floral Panels”
Session: Analogous Matter: Skeuomorphism as Method

Cynthia Kok is a Ph.D. candidate at Yale University. Her dissertation focuses on sensorial engagement in making and craft experiments with mother-of-pearl in the early modern Dutch world. Cynthia received her MA from Bard Graduate Center and her BA from the University of California, Berkeley. She has held curatorial internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute, the Frick Collection, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum and she is the 2021-2023 Kress History of Art Institutional Fellow at the Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society (LUCAS).

 

Honorable Mention:

Shoghig Halajian, University of California San Diego
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Destroying the Form: On the Spatial Politics of Rafa Esparza’s bust: A Mediation on Freedom”
Session: Monumentality in Art: Memory, History, and Impermanence in Diaspora

Shoghig Halajian is a curator and art historian, who serves on the Board of Directors at Human Resources LA and was previously Assistant Director at LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions). She is co-editor of the online journal Georgia, in collaboration with Anthony Carfello and Suzy Halajian, which is supported by a Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant. She has presented projects at the Hammer Museum and the ONE Archives at USC Libraries in Los Angeles; Le Magasin–National Center for Contemporary Art in Grenoble; Al Ma’mal Foundation for Art in Jerusalem, UKS in Oslo, among others. She was a 2021 Research Fellow at Ocean Space–TBA 21 in Venice. She is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History, Theory and Criticism with a Critical Gender Studies emphasis at University of California, San Diego, where her research explores contemporary queer aesthetics and performance through a critical race lens, focusing on artistic experiments with collaboration.


SAMUEL H. KRESS FOUNDATION CAA CONFERENCE SUPPORT FELLOWSHIP FOR INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARS

Recognizing the value of the international exchange of ideas and experience among art historians, the Kress Foundation is offering support for international scholars participating as speakers at the 2022 CAA Annual Conference. The scholarly focus of the papers must be European art before 1830.

 

Lorenzo Vigotti, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Diplomatic Exchanges and Architectural Inventions along the Silk Road: The Case of Soltaniyeh and Santa Maria del Fiore”
Session:  Beyond the Silk Road

Lorenzo is a trained architect with a M. Arch. from the University of Florence, Italy, and a Ph.D. in architectural history from Columbia University with a dissertation on the origin of the Renaissance palace. He is currently a post-doc at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, where he studies the shift in spatial organization in domestic residences between the 14th and the 15th century, with an emphasis on early collecting practices and the birth of the studiolo as a manifestation of power by the urban oligarchy. Together with Shahid Beheshti University in Tehran, Iran, Lorenzo is exploring the circulation of architectural knowledge between medieval Persia and Italy, specifically the materiality and the problems of preservation of brick dome structures. Finally, he oversees the virtual reconstruction of the now lost Florentine ghetto at the Medici Archive Project.

 

Ana Cristina Howie, University of Cambridge
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “’Favoured Black Attendants’ in ‘Splendid State Portraits’? Genoese merchants, Flemish painters, and the Spanish Atlantic Slave Trade”
Session:  Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages”

Ana is originally from New Zealand and completed her bachelor’s degree in the History of Art and French at the University of Auckland. She continued her studies at the Université Paris-Sorbonne, then earned her MA in the History of Art at the Courtauld Institute in London, specializing in early modern Netherlandish artistic production. She began her PhD under the supervision of Professor Ulinka Rublack at the University of Cambridge in 2019, funded by the Prince of Wales International Scholarship. Her doctoral research investigates the relationships between women, dress, and portraiture in seventeenth-century Genoa, with a focus on the oeuvres of Flemish painters Peter Paul Rubens and Antony van Dyck. She is the recipient of the inaugural Society for Renaissance Studies/British School in Rome Residential Doctoral Research Scholarship for 2021/22. Her work and projects have been supported by the Royal Historical Society, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, Magdalene College, Cambridge, and the Cambridge Trust.

 

Iro Katsaridou, Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki, Greece
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Through Foreign Eyes: Curating the 1821 Greek War of Independence”
Session: Instrumentalizing Memory and the Politics of Commemoration

Iro Katsaridou was recently (2021) appointed Director of the Thessaloniki Museum of Photography, Greece. Previously, she has worked as curator of modern and contemporary art at the Museum of Byzantine Culture in Thessaloniki. She studied art history at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the Université Paris I-Sorbonne, and also pursued museum studies at the City University of New York. Her doctoral dissertation (Aristotle University, 2010) focused on contemporary Greek photography. Iro has researched photography and art in wartime (World War I and II), curated exhibitions and edited related catalogues in this particular field. More recently (2021) she has curated an exhibition at the Museum of Byzantine Culture on the aspects of Philhellenic movements in art and the Greek War of Independence. She has taught as adjunct faculty at several Greek universities. She has co-edited two books on photography during the Nazi Occupation of Greece (1941-1944), one on the art of World War I in Greece, and written articles and book chapters on photography, museum policies, as well as the relationship between contemporary Greek art and politics. She has presented her research in international conferences, while in 2019 and 2020 she participated in the CAA-Getty International Program.

 

Jana Kantoříková, Sorbonne University/CNRS
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Crucified Women: The Way of the Cross in the Symbolist Movement”
Session: Women in Art in the second part of the 19th century-early part of the 20th

Jana Kantoříková is an associated researcher at the Center of Interdisciplinary Research on Central, Eastern and Balkanic Europe at Sorbonne University/CNRS. She received her PhD in Slavic Philology, History of Czech Literature and Literary Theory at the Charles University in Prague and the University of Regensburg (2018). She taught at the University of Passau (Germany) and the Sorbonne University. Her research focuses on European modernisms and cultural transfers between France, Germany and the Czech lands, for example “Horror Fragmenti in Czech Symbolism” in Angst, Anxiety, Anguish in Fin de Siècle Art and Literature (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020) or “Le Cycle de la volupté et de la mort : ‘livre empoisonné’ et ornementation du péché” in L’art (décoratif) du livre fin-de-siècle: éloge du parergon (Éditions Otrante, 2021). She is currently working on projects related to the reception of Friedrich Nietzsche in Central Europe and the blackness imagery in the Czech lands in the 19th century.

 

Judith Noorman, University of Amsterdam
Presentation: “The Invisibility Myth. Women, Art and Household Consumption in the Dutch Republic”
Session at the Annual Conference: Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages”

Judith Noorman is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Early Modern Period and Director of the Amsterdam Centre for Studies in Early Modernity (both at the University of Amsterdam). As of September 2021, she is leading a governmentally funded NWO VIDI project: The Female Impact. Women, Art and Household Consumption in the Dutch Republic, 1580-1720. She earned her PhD at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University and has conducted postdoctoral research at the Drawing Institute, Morgan Library & Museum. At the 110th CAA Annual Conference, she is presenting a paper on The Invisibility Myth. Women, Art and Household Consumption in the Dutch Republic, as part of the HNA-sponsored session Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages”, which is chaired by Carrie J. Anderson and Marsely Kehoe.


CAA-GETTY INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM

Every year since 2012, the CAA-Getty International Program has enabled art historians, museum curators, and artists who teach art history to attend CAA’s Annual Conference. This program is funded on an annual basis by the Getty Foundation. Meet the CAA-Getty International Program participants here.

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience. This week, we look forward to the research and scholarship that will be presented virtually at the upcoming Annual Conference. Many sessions feature talks that look at or investigate Blackness, racism, colonialism, neo-colonialism, and slavery, Black identity, theory of race, Afrofuturism, queerness, the African diaspora, and  intersections between these topics.

 

In chronological order:

 

February 17-19:

Reimagining the Past alongside Black Women Artists, Thursday, February 17, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Latinx Bodies: Presence/absence and representation (Part 1) , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

To See, to Keep, to Know: Photography and Intergenerational Knowledge Production, Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages,” , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

U.S. Latinx Art, Pre-1950 ,Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Latinx Bodies: Presence/Absence and Representation (Part 2) , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Haunting and Memory in Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora , Friday, February 18, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The air we breathe: aesthetics and politics of the breath in transpacific and transatlantic visual cultures ,Friday, February 18, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Flipping the Script , Friday, February 18, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

(re)activation of Exhibitions as sites of contestation, Friday, February 18, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Decolonial Teaching Methodologies in Digital Arts & Design, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

What’s the “matter” with American Sculpture?, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art ,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The Price of Blackness: African American art and visual culture in the first two decades of the Twenty-First Century, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (11:00 – 12:30 p.m. EST)

Knowing People: Black Practices in Queer Collaborations, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

‘Heresies’ and Other Mythologies, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art, Part II ,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Toward an Inclusive Methodology: Experiments in Art Writing,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

 

March 3-5

Women in Architecture: The African Exchange,Thursday, March 3, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The Promise of Modern Art and Design: Cold War-Era Art and Diplomacy,Thursday, March 3, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

DESIGN INCUBATION COLLOQUIUM 8.2: RECENT RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DESIGN , Thursday, March 3, 2022,9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Blackness and the Ashcan School, Thursday, March 3, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Carnival in Africa, Friday, March 4, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Curatorial Care: Feminist and Queer Practices ,Friday, March 4, 2022,9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST

Reading Kerry James Marshall’s ‘Rythm Mastr’, Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Transnational, Transcultural, Transversal: On the Decolonial Discourse of Art,Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Black Collage, Friday, March 4, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Abolitionist Aesthetics, Friday, March 4, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Art History and Social Justice in Practice ,Friday, March 4, 2022,4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Activist Exhibitions, Friday, March 4, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

On Afro-pessimism and Its Alternatives ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Reconsidering Art History Through Access ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)
New Perspectives in Art, Design, and Art History: Supporting and Showcasing Emerging Voices from Marginalized Communities ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

New Ways of Seeing ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Botanical Intimacies: Colonialism, Decolonial Practice, and Queered Ecologies , Saturday, March 5, 2022,4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

 

 

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