College Art Association

CAA News Today

mm-october-16
spectacle-of-late-maya-court

Mary Miller, Sterling Professor of History of Art at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, will deliver the keynote address during Convocation at the 2017 Annual Conference, to be held at the New York Hilton Midtown in Manhattan. Free and open to the public, Convocation takes place on Wednesday, February 15, 5:30–7:00 PM. The event will include the presentation of the annual Awards for Distinction and be followed by the conference’s Opening Reception.

Miller earned an AB in 1975 at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. Six years later she completed her PhD at Yale, joined the faculty there, and has remained at the school ever since. Miller was recently appointed as senior director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage at Yale. She also served as dean of Yale College from 2008 to 2014 and has taken many other professorial and administrative roles over the years.

Miller is the author of The Murals of Bonampak (1986), The Art of Mesoamerica: From Olmec to Aztec (1986), and Maya Art and Architecture (1999). A frequent collaborator, she wrote The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya (1993) with Karl Taube and edited A Pre-Columbian World (2006) with Jeffrey Quilter and The Aztec Calendar Stone (2010) with Khristaan D. Villela. In recent years Miller edited Painting a Map of Sixteenth-Century Mexico City (2012), a study of a rare indigenous map in Yale’s Beinecke Library, with Barbara Mundy and completed The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (2013) with Claudia Brittenham.

Miller has written essays for both of CAA’s scholarly print publications. In “A Re-examination of the Mesoamerican Chacmool,” published in The Art Bulletin in 1985, Miller proposed Maya sources for “the form, location, variety, and iconography” of the chacmool, the Mesoamerican stone sculptures of reclining male figures associated with war and sacrifice; previous scholarship had assumed they were of Central American origin and introduced to the Maya during the Toltec era.[1] In “Shaped Time,” published in Art Journal in 2009, Miller considered George Kubler’s 1962 landmark study The Shape of Time, “so rich in its textured treatment of the ways that streams of history and art-making intersect.”[2] She drew on her deep knowledge of ancient Mesoamerica to contextualize the book in relation to both Kubler’s research and other postwar scholarship in the field.

In 1988 Miller and Linda Schele accepted CAA’s Alfred H. Barr Award for museum scholarship for The Blood of Kings: Dynasty and Ritual in Maya Art (1986). The book, with photographs by Justin Kerr, was the catalogue for a traveling exhibition organized by Schele and Miller for the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas.

Among Miller’s many accolades are a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2010 she gave the fifty-ninth A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC—one of the highest honors in American art history.

CAA communicated with Miller via email last month. Here’s what she had to say.

How has teaching art history changed over the last twenty years?

Well, that takes us back to 1996, and just about then I volunteered to be the departmental pioneer (or guinea pig, take your pick) for digital images. I had to wrestle with the visual resources department to be allowed to build my own PowerPoints in that first iteration! And before I knew it, the slide cabinets had departed for remote storage. But that is the technical change. There are other changes that come along, especially in terms of what it is students bring to the class, and how the visual image is beginning to be the center for most of them.

What were the most important lessons you learned while serving as a dean?

You don’t want to know most of them! But, seriously, I gave a lot of thought to grading while dean. I also paid attention to learning outcomes, especially the importance of short assignments and detailed feedback early in the term. And I committed to developing opportunities for public speaking for students in class—a critical part of education but rarely intentionally instructed these days.

What does your current research concern?

My current research is focused on the gold disks of the Sacred Cenote at Chichén Itzá. The only serious study of the full set of them was published in 1952, although everyone knows them. Or thinks they know them. They’ve turned out to be even more fascinating than I though they’d be: the material—gold—was entirely new to the Maya of the ninth century, the technique of executing imagery on it entirely new as well. And then the imagery itself quite distinct. All but one of the disks were burned, ripped into pieces, crumpled, stomped upon, and then hurled into the Cenote (and the “one” is distinct only in not having been torn apart). There is meaning embedded in that dramatic ending! But three other projects have been developing along the edges. I keep all the files and notes for one of them—a history of the dealers, collectors, and materials that are critical to the formation of pre-Hispanic art as a field in the United States, 1940 onward—in a folder I call “The Rabbit Hole,” which tells you it is a wild and winding journey.

What was your first CAA Annual Conference experience like?

Oh, gosh. I think I was the driver of a group of Yale graduate students to DC [in 1979] and I am almost certain that George Shackelford was in the car. I’d had the bad fortune to have my wallet relieved of folding bills while I snoozed in the Yale Art and Architecture Library, so I scrounged together $40 to make the trip. I slept in the basement of a house some of my college friends shared near the Washington Cathedral, and then I hiked down Mass Ave to the Hilton—a good distance, I can assure you. I attended a session chaired by Joel Snyder that thrilled me. I watched a grad-school colleague give a presentation on African time, among other talks, and I had a lot of fun.

What are two or three pressing issues that both artists and academics share?

We all share the problem of the Google search: no matter what I am looking for, once I start searching for images, by page three the algorithm is offering me pictures of Van Gogh’s Sunflowers. If I am looking for a work of art, then surely I must want Sunflowers!

Seriously, I think the most pressing issue we share is that of conservation and preservation. How can the past—or the present—be preserved for the future?

Can you give us a teaser of what you will discuss at Convocation?

Well, last year I gave a talk at the Clark Art Institute in which I said art history can play a different role in twenty-first-century humanities than it did in twentieth-century humanities. I’ve developed these ideas more fully—and I hope I have some interesting things to say to the community of art historians, and the community of artists!

Notes

[1] See Mary Ellen Miller, “A Re-examination of the Mesoamerican Chacmool,” The Art Bulletin 67, no. 1 (March 1985): 7–17.

[2] See Mary Miller, “Shaped Time,” Art Journal 68, no. 4 (Winter 2009): 71–77.

saggesePhoto Credit Maxwell Leung, Ph.D., CCA

The 2017 Annual Conference in New York, taking place February 15­–18, boasts a number of presentations addressing the intersections of race and contemporary art, colonialism in art history, and the Black Lives Matter movement. Here are a few highlights:

Deborah Willis of New York University and Cheryl Finley from Cornell University will provide a historical overview through a session titled “Picturing Social Movements from Emancipation to Black Lives Matter.” Kellie Jones, an art historian at Columbia University and winner of a 2016 MacArthur fellowship, is among the speakers. Public Art Dialogue, one of CAA’s many affiliated societies, will host a discussion on “Public Art in the Era of Black Lives Matter.” The first presenter will be Evie Terrono from Randolph-Macon College in Virginia, who has researched “Symbolic Interventions, New Narratives: Challenging the Authority of the Confederate Flag.”

The session “Race and Labor in the Art Worldwill be chaired by Hayes Peter Mauro of Queensborough Community College, City University of New York. The scheduled speakers—Sarah Cervenak, John Ott, and LaTanya Autry—teach in North Carolina, Virginia, and Connecticut, respectively. Elsewhere, four panelists will offer case studies of race and representation in nineteenth-century art, and another collection of scholars will examine “Blackness, Violence, Representation.” The Arts Council of the African Studies Association, also a CAA affiliated society, has given the tantalizing title of “Flesh” to its session, while another panel will give form to “Post-Black and Liquid Blackness” in contemporary African American art.

Richard Hylton from University for the Creative Arts in England will lead a panel that sheds light on British perspectives regarding “Contemporary Art, Ethnography, and the Western Museum,” while scholars from Italy and South Africa will lead a session called “Writing Art History in the Margins: Rethinking Centers and Peripheries in ‘Non-Western’ Art Historiography.” Finally, the Association for Critical Race Art History, another CAA affiliate, will present “Riff: Black Artists and the European Canon.” Among the artists to be examined are Robert Colescott, Carrie Mae Weems, and Moe Brooker.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Uncategorized

CAA is excited to present talks by the following special guests at the 105th Annual Conference, taking place February 15–18, 2017, in New York.

mm-october-16Keynote Speaker

This year Mary Miller, a scholar of art of the ancient New World, Sterling Professor of History of Art, and senior director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage at Yale University, will deliver the keynote address during Convocation.

This special event, to be held on the first evening of the Annual Conference, includes a welcome from Suzanne Preston Blier, CAA president, and Hunter O’Hanian, CAA executive director, as well as the presentation of annual Awards for Distinction.

Convocation is free and open to the public.

va2014po_CocoFusco-Dr.Zira Visual Arts; artists portraits. Coco Fusco as Dr. Zira, November 6, 2014.

Distinguished Artist Interviews

Organized by CAA’s Services to Artists Committee, the Distinguished Artist Interviews feature esteemed artists who discuss their work with a respected colleague. The interviews are held as part of ARTspace, a program partially funded by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

First, the artist and activist Coco Fusco will be in conversation with the art historian Steven Nelson of the University of California, Los Angeles. Next, the painter Katherine Bradford will speak with a fellow artist, Judith Bernstein.

The Distinguished Artist Interviews are free and open to the public.

unknownDistinguished Scholar

Kaja Silverman, a historian of art and film, critical theorist, and Katherine and Keith L. Sachs Professor of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania, will be recognized as CAA’s Distinguished Scholar for 2017 in this special session.

In addition to remarks from Silverman, the panel will feature talks from Richard Meyer, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor in Art History at Stanford University, and Homay King, Professor of History of Art at Bryn Mawr College.

Please join the speakers for a reception immediately following the session in the Third Floor East Promenade. A cash bar will be available.

Conference registration is required to attend the Distinguished Scholar Session.

Film Screening: Eva Hesse

posted by November 28, 2016

Zeitgeist Films offers a free screening of the acclaimed documentary Eva Hesse (2016) to attendees of CAA’s 2017 Annual Conference. Directed by Marcie Begleiter and produced by Karen Shapiro, the film is the first feature-length appreciation of this important artist’s life and work.

Eva Hesse makes superb use of the artist’s voluminous journals, her correspondence with her close friend and mentor Sol LeWitt, and archival and contemporary interviews with fellow artists—among them Richard Serra, Robert Mangold, and Dan Graham—who recall her passionate, ambitious, and tenacious personality.

The screening will talk place on Wednesday, February 15, from 7:00 to 9:00 PM in the Time Warner Screening Room, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Center, Museum of Modern Art, 4 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019. The museum is half a block from the New York Hilton Midtown, the headquarters hotel.

The audience is limited to fifty people. Please send your RSVP (required) to emily@zeitgeistfilms.com.

CAA Student Scholarships
with support from tf-logo
blick-utrecht-logo-bw-prof

Registration is in full swing for the 2017 Annual Conference in New York, February 15-18.

We are always listening to what our members want and seeking out the benefits to fit your needs. That is why we have partnered up our sponsors, multinational publisher, Routledge, Taylor & Francis, and art materials specialist, Blick Art Materials, to create a student scholarship fund to assist CAA Student Members with conference costs.

Routledge, Taylor & Francis Student Scholarship

CAA’s Annual Conference Partner Sponsor, Routledge, Taylor & Francis will award four (4) CAA Student Members with complimentary registration and an additional $250 in scholarship money to help with conference expenses such as travel, housing, or meals. Receipts will be required for reimbursement.   

Blick Art Materials Student Scholarship

CAA’s Annual Conference Presenter Sponsor, Blick Art Materials will also fund conference registration fees for four (4) CAA Student Members. No travel expenses are available.

Criteria for the Scholarship

Awardee will be chosen by lottery on the following criteria:

  • Individuals must be registered for the Annual Conference by the Early Registration deadline
  • Individuals must be current CAA student members (proof of student status will be required by the 8 winners chosen)
  • Individuals cannot receive conference registration or travel reimbursement from their institution or employer

What does this mean for you? It means register today for the 2017 Annual Conference before the Early Registration deadline for a chance to be one of the lucky 8 CAA Student Members to receive one of these scholarships. Recipients will be randomly selected by CAA and announced in mid January.

We look forward to seeing you in New York!

Filed under: Annual Conference, Uncategorized

The Artist as Entrepreneur

posted by November 14, 2016

sponsoredpost_275New York Foundation for the Arts, 20 Jay Street, Seventh Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Participants: 60
Pricing: $50
Date: Tuesday, February 14, 2017
9:30 AM – 4:00 PM

This Valentine’s Day, the College Art Association (CAA) and the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) are showing their love for artists by partnering to offer professional development programming, “The Artist as Entrepreneur,” the day before the CAA Annual Conference. This day-long event has been customized to fit the needs of CAA artist members but is open to all artists. It allows participants the opportunity to attend part of the CAA Annual Conference with a ticket to a session of their choice. Participants are also welcome to join numerous conference events that are open to the public.

NYFA’s “The Artist as Entrepreneur” is a course that teaches the fundamental principles of sustainability—and ultimately profitability—in the arts. This includes topics such as strategic planning, finance, and marketing. Additional material is drawn from NYFA’s popular textbook which accompanies this curriculum, The Profitable Artist (Allworth Press, 2011). The structure is a blend of formal lectures, breakout groups, and one-on-one meetings. Participants work through a flexible and dynamic “action plan,” which provides a blueprint for their practice or specific projects. Each receives specific feedback from experts in the field as well as their peers in the course.

Register for “The Artist as Entrepreneur.”

First come, first served.

To learn more about NYFA Learning, please see a list of programs on their website.

What is myCAA?

posted by October 14, 2016

artnews

With the opening of conference registration for the 2017 Annual Conference in New York, February 15-18, you might have seen us mention our new campaign, myCAA.

myCAA is a way for us to tell our members, and even those outside our membership in the arts and culture field, that we are listening. And that we want to hear from you! myCAA is about opening up the channels of communication member to member and between the CAA staff, board, committees, and affiliates. We are all in this together, each and every person involved in CAA. From the administrative and staff side of CAA, we know the organization exists because of the support of our members and those working in the visual arts field. Your support helps us in turn support you in your professional teaching, scholarship, and art making. We see this circle as vital to the impact that art historians, artists, and scholars have on the field of visual arts and on society as a whole.

We want to hear from you on CAA Connect, our new digital discussion and resource library platform. The myCAA community is where members should post any and all thoughts they have about how to make CAA an organization that serves the profession at the highest level. How to log in to CAA Connect.

At the conference, we want to hear from you. Stop a CAA staff member, board member, or committee member in the hallway, in sessions, or in the Hilton lobby! Say hello and tell us how we can make CAA the best organization it can be to support your efforts and your work.

Call us. Email us. Write to us. Send us a carrier pigeon.

We know that our members and those working in the visual arts contribute to and improve society every single day. myCAA is the call for our members to use their voices and to tell us how we can help so you can push forward and change the world.

craftactioncallforsubmissionsCAA Media Lounge
105th Annual Conference NYC 2017
Submission Deadline
Nov 30, 2016

Craft Action: Genre Bending 

Craft Action: Genre Bending is a juried video screening exploring the role of process, skill, and action as it relates to craft mediums. The growing interdisciplinarity of craft practices is the impetus for this call for submissions of video work by practitioners engaged craft media, such as ceramics, textiles, metals, wood, and glass. The use of video with craft enables the artist to engage in using materials and tools in combination with their representation to express new ideas, addressing making by investigating not only what is shown, but how it is shown.

Media Lounge is CAA’s main stage of new media explorations where students, academics, and artists come together to build camaraderie. These methods of working with conceptual and technical content provides fodder for a dynamic dialogue of how artists’ place themselves in the larger distinction of media, both analog and digital.

Each year Media Lounge coordinates a central theme to explore the interrelationship of media across a topic. This year in NYC, Media Lounge presents screenings, panels and discussions that explore the genres of craft and video, politics and strategy, and inter-related material explorations of new media and footage that entangles what is expected of cross-disciplinary explosions of content, surrounding the theme of Genre Bending.

Genre is a way to group practices into categories that are familiar-or frame an expected experience from the audience. Media Lounge NYC 2017 uses genre and the elasticity of bending to explore new media genre relationships and their impulse of hybrid crossovers.

Anne Sophie-Lehman has theorized that the combination of craft and film produces its own unique genre, which she calls “showing making”. Part archival, part instructional, part visual pleasure, and part showmanship, this idea of genre bending and genre production is the starting point for this year’s Media Lab theme.

Craft Action: Genre Bending seeks to explore how artists bend, break, subvert, or invent new genres for craft and film. Artists will be asked to note in their application what genre/s they see themselves as bending or creating. This may be a traditional genre, like comedy, tragedy, animation, or a craft-based genre like the instructional demonstration – or a genre yet-to-be defined that can provoke new understanding and considerations.

Artwork Requirements

All video submission must be original works of art completed within the last 3 years.

Submission Guidelines

  • Entries will be accepted from the link HERE
  • Artists are required to submit video as Vimeo files, opening up the access of the files to shared
  • The video(s) should be an excerpt totaling no longer than 5 minutes.
  • Artists may submit up to three videos to be selected

Screening Dates and Panel Discussion

CAA Conference Media Lounge
February 16, 2017
Thursday 1:30-3

Guest Curators and Conference Panelists

Marilyn Zapf is the Assistant Director at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) and Curator of CCCD’s Benchspace Gallery & Workshop in Asheville, NC where she has curated a number of nationally-traveling exhibitions including Made in WNC (2015) and Gee’s Bend: From Quilts to Prints (2014). Zapf teaches courses on the History of Craft at Warren Wilson College and publishes articles and reviews in international publications, including Art Jewelry Form and Crafts Magazine (UK). She is a founding member of the international experimental history of design collective, Fig. 9, holds a MA in the History of Design from the Royal College of Art and Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England, and a BA (English Literature) and BFA (Jewelry and Metalworking) from The University of Georgia. Her areas of research include craft, postmodernism and de/industrialization.

Namita Gupta Wiggers is a curator, writer, educator and artist based in Portland, Oregon. She is the Director of Critical Craft Forum, and Exhibitions Review Editor, Journal of Modern Craft. From 2004-12 Wiggers served as the Curator, and later Director and Chief Curator (2012 -14) of Museum of Contemporary Craft. She curated over 65 exhibitions, including: New Embroidery: Not Your Grandma’s Doily, Touching Warms the Art, The Academy is Full of Craft, Object Focus: The Bowl, and Manufractured: The Conspicuous Transformation of Everyday Objects (curated by Steven Skov Holt and Mara Holt Skov), and Gestures of Resistance (curated by Judith Leemann and Shannon Stratton.). She curated the first museum exhibitions on Betty Feves, Laurie Herrick, Nikki McClure, Emily Pilloton, and Ken Shores. Recent exhibitions include Across the Table, Across the Land with Michael Strand for NCECA’s 50th Anniversary, and Everything has been Material for Scissors to Shape, on view at the Wing Luke Museum of Asian American Experience. Wiggers is editing a Companion on Contemporary Craft (Wiley Blackwell), and collaborating on a project focused on gender and jewelry with Benjamin Lignel.

Entry Fee

Free

Venue

Hilton New York Midtown, College Art Association Conference, Media lounge

ArtSpace + Media Lounge

CAA’s Services to Artists Committee hosts offerings in ArtSpace and Media Lounge, a “conference within a conference” of innovative programs that are of special interest to artists, emerging professionals, and artist / educators. ArtSpace and Media Lounge programming offers an informal, dynamic setting with sessions, panels, screenings, curated media, distinguished artists interviews, exhibition opportunities and other social events. These programs are free and open to the public, and do not require CAA membership or registration fees for the conference to participate or attend.

Thank you in advance for your participation and please feel free to contact carissacarman at gmail.com if you have questions regarding the submission.

CAA Seeks Mock Interviewers

posted by September 26, 2016

ram_6759Participants in the Interview Hall at the 2016 Annual Conference (photograph by Bradley Marks)

CAA’s Student and Emerging Professionals Committee seeks established professionals to volunteer as practice job interviewers for the Mock Interview Sessions at the 2017 Annual Conference in New York. Participating as an interviewer is an excellent way to serve the field and to assist with the professional development of the next generation of artists and scholars.

In these sessions, interviewers pose as a prospective employer, speaking with individuals in a scenario similar to the Interview Hall at the conference. Each session comprises approximately 10–15 minutes of interview questions and a quick review of the application packet, followed by 5–10 minutes of candid feedback. Whenever possible, the committee matches interviewers and interviewees based on medium or discipline.

Interested candidates must be current CAA members and prepared to give six successive twenty-minute interviews with feedback in a two-hour period during one of the following times:

Thursday, February 16: 11:30AM–1:30 PM
Thursday, February 16: 3:00–5:00 PM
Friday, February 17: 9:00–11:00 AM
Friday, February 17: 2:00–4:00 PM

Interviewers should be art historians, art educators, designers, museum-studies professionals, critics, curators, and studio artists with significant experience in their fields or experience on a search committee.

You may volunteer for one, two, three, or all four Mock Interview Sessions. All sessions occur in the SEPC Lounge. Please send your name, affiliation, position, contact information, and the days and times that you are available to Megan Koza Mitchell, chair of the Student and Emerging Professionals Committee. Deadline: January 31, 2017.

The Mock Interview Sessions are not intended as a screening process by institutions seeking new hires.

2017 Annual Conference Registration is Now Open!

posted by September 23, 2016

google-doc-banner

Artwork by Julia Oldham, The Loneliest Place, 2015. Art Journal Spring 2016.

Our very busy September at CAA rolls on. Earlier this month we launched CAA Connect, our new digital discussion and resource library platform. This week, we open registration for the 2017 Annual Conference in New York, February 15–18, 2017 at the New York Hilton Midtown. With the opening of registration we also launch myCAA, a new campaign aimed at making CAA the best organization for its members. MyCAA is designed to encourage participation in and ownership of CAA. You will hear more about myCAA in the coming months, but contributing to the myCAA discussion community on CAA Connect is a great start! There is also an Annual Conference discussion community that will help us build a better conference with your feedback.

For the 2017 Annual Conference we kept registration rates the same as the 2016 Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. and we managed to secure the lowest hotel rates for New York City since 2011. This is all part of our effort to create an Annual Conference our members will return to year after year. Single session tickets are also now at the lowest rate since 2001.

Early and online registration is available through December 19, 2016.

The 2017 Annual Conference will have more sessions than ever, an astounding 270-plus, due to the changes we made to the conference structure last year. We are thrilled to welcome two leading scholars as our Convocation Speaker and our Distinguished Scholar for 2017.

Convocation Keynote Speaker

Mary Miller, Sterling Professor of History of Art, and recently appointed the senior director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage at Yale University

Distinguished Scholar

Kaja Silverman, Katherine Stein Sachs CW’69 and Keith L. Sachs W’67 Professor of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania 

Also new for the 2017 Annual Conference:

  • Opening Night Reception will be free and open to all attendees with a cash bar
  • Debut of Saturday Symposia, featuring a day-long series of panels on specific subjects important to the membership. The topics for the 2017 conference include museums; the design field; international art history; and interventions in the future of art history
  • Free and Public Noon Forums with leaders and luminaries from the field
  • myCAA Friday afternoon meeting and new board announcement with executive director Hunter O’Hanian and CAA staff
  • Re-imagined professional development workshops

For more information on travel discounts, car rentals, and booking your hotel room, visit the conference website, email CAA Member Services at membership@collegeart.org, or call 212-691-1051, ext. 1.

We look forward to seeing you in New York!

Filed under: Annual Conference, Uncategorized