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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by April 11, 2018

Paul Cézanne, Madame Cézanne in a Red Dress, from 1888–1890. Courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met Goes Beyond Its Doors to Pick a Leader Who Bridges Art and Technology

For the first time in 60 years, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has reached beyond its own doors for a new leader. (New York Times)

Frick Collection, With Fourth Expansion Plan, Crosses Its Fingers Again

The garden that upended the museum’s previous attempt to renovate its 1914 Gilded Age mansion is now the centerpiece of its revised design. (New York Times)

US Army Teams Up With Conservators to Preserve Outdoor Art

Art conservators and the Army Research Laboratory are working together to conserve outdoor painted sculpture by Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and Tony Smith. (Hyperallergic)

The Lurchingly Uneven Portraits of Paul Cézanne

In an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, wonderments consort with clunkers, often on the same canvas. (The New Yorker)

Humanities and science collaboration isn’t well understood, but letting off STEAM is not the answer

The humanities are not just an ethical adjunct to the sciences. (The Conversation)

International Arts Rights Advisors Survey on Online Harassment

As an artist have you been intimidated, trolled, harassed or bullied online? Share your experiences with International Arts Rights Advisors (IARA), a collective of arts and human rights experts, in this anonymous survey. (IARA)

The Most Beautiful College Libraries in America

Celebrate #NationalLibraryWeek with these academic libraries. (Travel + Leisure)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by April 04, 2018

Michael Rakowitz in front of The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist in Trafalgar Square. Photo by Caroline Teo, via artnet News.

Art’s Most Popular: Exhibition and Museum Visitor Figures 2017

The Art Newspaper’s just-published annual survey ranks the world’s most visited shows, reveals the most cultured city in the US, and explains the secrets behind naming a blockbuster. (The Art Newspaper)

Louvre Says “Non” to Minister’s Mona Lisa Grand Tour

France’s culture minister Françoise Nyssen initially proposed lending the work as a way to fight “cultural segregation.” (The Art Newspaper)

Tourist Attraction in Indonesia Rips Off Chris Burden, Yayoi Kusama, and Museum of Ice Cream

A tourism park in Indonesia aiming to be a destination for selfies is under fire for its attractions that copy widely recognized contemporary artworks. (Hyperallergic)

Why the City of Los Angeles Hired a “Chief Design Officer”

Christopher Hawthorne, The Los Angeles Times architecture critic since 2004, will become the city’s first chief design officer, a position offered to him by Mayor Eric Garcetti. (Hyperallergic) 

The Ghost of Iraq’s Lost Heritage Comes to Trafalgar Square as Michael Rakowitz Unveils His Fourth Plinth Sculpture

The Iraqi-American artist unveiled his Fourth Plinth commission in London on March 28th. (artnet News)

John Baldessari Gets the Greatest Accolade of Them All – a Guest Turn on The Simpsons

John Baldessari has been the recipient of countless awards in the course of his long career. But last week, he received the highest honor of them all: a guest appearance on The Simpsons(Apollo Magazine)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 28, 2018

Poster by De’Janae Gilliam for March for Our Lives. Courtesy Amplifier.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Duty to Protect

California Supreme Court has determined public colleges in the state must warn and shield their students from potential violent acts. Experts say the ruling could have nationwide implications. (Inside Higher Ed)

London Arts and Textiles Educator Named ‘World’s Best Teacher’

Andria Zafirakou, who teaches at a northwest London community school in one of the poorest areas in the country, is the first British winner of the annual Global Teacher Prize. (The Guardian)

Centuries Later, People Still Don’t Know What to Make of Las Meninas

Scholars have been analyzing Diego Velázquez’s 1656 painting for over three centuries, and still haven’t settled on its meaning. (Artsy)

Cy Twombly’s Extravagant Synesthesia

“Rosalind Krauss misreads Twombly in more ways than I can enumerate.” Read John Yau’s take. (Hyperallergic)

These Are the Posters Students Carried at the March for Our Lives

The art and activism organization Amplifier gave away more than 40,000 posters nationwide. (CNN)

ACLU Files Art Censorship Lawsuit against the City of New Orleans

The ACLU alleges the city’s onerous process for getting approval for murals violates the right to free expression. (The Art Newspaper)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 21, 2018

Image: Free Cooper Union, via Wikimedia Commons

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

In a Historic Vote, Renowned Art School Cooper Union Commits to Bringing Back Free Tuition For All

The school may be tuition-free again as early as 2029. (artnet News)

How Do You Know If You’ve Hung a Painting Upside Down?

Genevieve Habert was the only one to realize something was amiss at the Museum of Modern Art’s Henri Matisse exhibition. (Artsy)

‘I Need a College Degree to Make This?’ Asks Arizona Teacher Who Posted Salary Online

Arizona teachers are mobilizing after the West Virginia teachers’ strike. (Star Telegram)

Clashing Visions, Simmering Tensions: How a Confluence of Forces Led to MOCA’s Firing of Helen Molesworth

The news that Helen Molesworth, one of the most prominent curators in the United States, had been fired from her job at MOCA last week sent shockwaves through the art world. (artnet News)

Long Before MRIs, Santiago Ramón y Cajal Revealed the Inner Workings of the Brain

American viewers are getting a chance to see Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s drawings for the first time. (Artsy)

How Much of Conservators’ Work Should Be Visible and How Much Should Be Hidden?

The release of a pre-conservation image of Salvator Mundi reignites debate over the transparency of conservators’ interventions. (The Art Newspaper)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 14, 2018

Vetting at the 2018 TEFAF Maastricht fair. Photo: Loraine Bodewes, courtesy of TEFAF via Artnet News.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

National School Walkout: Live Updates

Thousands of students walked out of their schools today in a nationwide demonstration, one month after a gunman killed 17 people at a high school in Florida. (The New York Times)

MOCA Fires Chief Curator Helen Molesworth for ‘Undermining the Museum,’ According to Report

The reasons behind the firing comes via artist and MOCA trustee Catherine Opie. (Artnet News)

New Adventures in Old Masters: How Art Historical Detective Work Gives Dealers at TEFAF an Edge

See how three TEFAF dealers found Canova’s “fake” self-portrait of Giorgione and a Munch better than MoMA’s. (Artnet News)

Picasso Painting Offered in Money-Laundering Scheme, US Feds Say

Earlier this month the US Department of Justice unveiled a multi-count indictment in a federal court. (The Art Newspaper)

Lost Art: Field of the Cloth of Gold

Noah Charney shares the stories behind some of art history’s most important works—those that we can no longer see. (The Art Newspaper)

Trump Nominates New Chairman for the National Endowment for the Humanities

President Trump on Friday nominated Jon Parrish Peede as chairman of the NEH, bringing to an end speculation about who would take the helm at an agency he has repeatedly targeted for elimination. (New York Times)

The Gray Market: Why Art Censorship Is Built into Facebook’s DNA

In late December, Facebook censored a user’s personal post featuring an image of the Venus of Willendorf. (artnet News)

Someone Yarn-Bombed a Guggenheim Museum Toilet with Gold Crochet

“We can confirm an intervention of a crocheted piece that covered a toilet on the museum’s Ramp 4.” (Hyperallergic)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 07, 2018

Anonymous bingo card from 2018 Annual Conference, featured in “Sans Cowl” by Andy Campbell.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Sans Cowl

“Sometime in the middle of the day on Friday, neon-colored CAA bingo cards started to appear on the ephemera table…’Statement’ glasses? Check. Architectural tunic sans cowl? It’s my new uniform. Carrying a different tote bag than the one everyone got for ‘free?’ Wouldn’t leave home without it.” Read Andy Campbell’s great, and hilarious, takeaway from CAA 2018. (Artforum)

Uncovering the Secrets of the Girl With a Pearl Earring

Using new exploratory technologies, the Mauritshuis museum is conducting a two-week public study of Vermeer’s most famous artwork. (New York Times)

New Cooper Union President Is Focusing on Free Tuition’s Return

New president Laura Sparks aims to get the college back to free tuition in ten years time. (The Villager)

Neanderthals Made Cave Paintings before Modern Humans Even Reached Europe

The paintings appear to predate the arrival of modern humans in Europe by 20,000 years. (Hyperallergic)

All of West Virginia’s Teachers Have Been on Strike for over a Week

Thousands of public school teachers across West Virginia have been on strike for more than a week in protest over their pay and benefits. (Vox)

Giant Monet Painting Discovered in Louvre Storage and Returned to Japan

Missing for almost 60 years, the painting was found severely damaged in a Louvre storage facility. (Hyperallergic)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 28, 2018

Salvator Dalí, Untitled, 1932. Courtesy of Heather James Fine Art New York.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Scholars Weave Craft into the Art History Canon at CAA

“I think this all says we are finally at the point that we can stop talking about craft as underdog and understand that craft is a part of contemporary art and theory.” (The Art Newspaper)

A Salvador Dalí Expert Says He Has Rediscovered One of the Artist’s Long-Lost Paintings

The never-before-seen painting dates to 1932. (artnet News)

Supreme Court Forbids Seizure of Ancient Persian Artifacts

The case required the Supreme Court to determine what types of assets are immune from seizure under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act. (Reuters)

Science Reveals Hidden Secrets in Picasso Works

Scientists using x-rays have revealed secrets behind both paintings and sculptures of the famed artist. (Gizmodo)

Duchamp Collection Descending the Art Museum Steps — and Off to Travel the World

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is sending its celebrated Duchamp collection to Japan in the fall, followed by stops in South Korea and Australia. (Whyy)

Found: A 700-Year-Old Ring Adorned With St. Nicholas

The artifact likely dates to a period between the 12th and 15th centuries. (Atlas Obscura)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 14, 2018

Former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama stand next to their newly unveiled portraits during a ceremony Monday at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump’s Budget Plan Again Calls for Slashing Arts, Public Media Funding

For a second year, President Trump has proposed the elimination of federal funding for public media and the arts. (Billboard)

Paintings of Barack and Michelle Obama Unveiled at Portrait Gallery

The paintings, by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald respectively, are a historic first. (NPR)

Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours: a Pre-Photographic Guide for Artists and Naturalists

A look at the preeminent guide to color for artists, scientists, naturalists, and anthropologists in the 19th-century. (Colossal)

The Greatest Lovers in Art History, from Frida Kahlo and Auguste Rodin to Nan Goldin

Love it or hate it, get in the Valentine’s Day spirit with these artworks. (Artsy)

One of the Earliest Illustrated Medical Books Offers a Lens Into Medieval Health

Originally published in 1491, Fasciculus medicinae quickly proved popular, and dozens of editions followed until 1522. (Hyperallergic)

Meet the Brooklyn Puppet Designer Behind the Fantastical Olympics Opening Ceremony

A five-minute performance represented a year of hard work for artist Nicholas Mahon. (artnet News)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 07, 2018

John Singleton Copley, Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis), ca 1763, oil on canvas (© Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Bequest of Winslow Warren)

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Boston and Philadelphia’s Art Museums Gamble Loaning a Painting on the Super Bowl

It looks like the MFA will be sending John Singleton Copley’s Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis) to the City of Brotherly Love. (Hyperallergic)

A Peek at Famous Readers’ Borrowing Records from a Private New York Library

Thanks to carefully maintained circulation info, we know when Alexander Hamilton checked out Goethe. (Atlas Obscura)

Sprawling Maya Network Discovered Under Guatemala Jungle

Laser technology was used to survey digitally beneath the forest canopy, revealing houses, palaces, elevated highways, and defensive fortifications. (BBC)

Liberal Indoctrination? Not So Much

New research suggests that college is a time when students gain appreciation of multiple perspectives. (Inside Higher Ed)

7 Artists Reinventing the Ancient Art of Mosaics

From the floors of ancient Pompeii to the walls of the New York subway, mosaics have been a feature of urban life for thousands of years. (Artsy)

AI May Have Just Decoded a Mystical 600-Year-Old Manuscript That Baffled Humans for Decades

The 240-page Voynich manuscript is written in an unknown script and an unknown language that no one has been able to interpret—until now. (artnet News)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 31, 2018

Athi-Patra Ruga, Miss Azania — Exile is waiting, 2015, South Africa, 11th African Biennale of Photography

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Paris on Alert as River Seine Continues to Rise and Louvre Shuts Basements

The iconic museum had to close its basement amid the flooding, in a bid to protect the priceless artworks on display there. (The Sun)

Morris Louis Painting Shown at Jewish Museum, This Time Right-Side-Up

After years of being hung incorrectly, a work by Morris Louis has now been flipped 180 degrees. (New York Times)

PHOTOS: Shaking Up the Idea of What Africa Looks Like

The 11th African Biennale of Photography explores topics of identity and possibility through the theme of “Afrotopia.” (NPR)

Two Rodin Shows Cast the Sculptor’s Legacy in Very Different Lights

In New York, two major Rodin shows are up at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Brooklyn Museum. (Hyperallergic)

Around the World in 14,000 “Do Not Disturb” Signs

Collector Edoardo Flores has amassed a collection of over 14,000 designs from more than 200 countries. (Atlas Obscura)

Languages Prioritized Over Arts in UK Government Teacher Plans

As the UK pushes for 75% of its students to study a foreign language, teaching time devoted to music, drama, art and design in secondary schools is set to drop. (Art Professional)

Filed under: CAA News