College Art Association

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Take Action to Keep Graduate Education Affordable

posted by CAA — Nov 10, 2017

Image: University of Washington

“The idea of taxing people on money they don’t get is absurd.”
Hunter O’Hanian, CAA Executive Director, Nov 10, 2017

On November 2, the House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee released the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.” Among many provisions that would affect higher education, their version of the bill would treat tuition waivers as taxable income, increasing the tax liability of hundreds of thousands of graduate students.

While the Senate’s version, released on November 9, does not consider tuition waivers taxable income, the House plan could still become law.

This potential additional tax burden would cut into the modest stipends with which many graduate students already struggle to make ends meet. It would make graduate school unaffordable to many, and seriously deplete future generations of scholars and leaders.

With Congress aiming to pass this bill by Thanksgiving, it is urgent to speak out against the House’s provision.

Click here to urge Congress to oppose this provision

Read more on the issue:

Why Graduate Students Are Worried about the Republican Tax Plan (Artsy)

The GOP Tax Plan Will Destroy Graduate Education (Forbes)

The Republican Tax Plan Could Financially Devastate Graduate Students (The Verge)

We thank our colleagues at the National Humanities Alliance for their advocacy on this issue.

Filed under: Advocacy, Higher Education, Students

Why the CAA Annual Conference Matters

posted by CAA — Nov 09, 2017

CAA 105th Annual Conference in New York, 2017. Photo: Ben Fractenberg

At the CAA Board of Director’s meeting in late October, the Board and staff took a detailed look at the Annual Conference and why it matters to the field.

Without question, recent changes like shorter sessions and more diversity have been very popular. In fact, results from our 2017 Annual Conference survey found that 82% of the attendees were satisfied as either presenters or attendees.

As we look at the value that the conference provides members and to the fields of art and design, and art history, here are some thoughts from CAA Board of Directors about the impact of the conference:

  • It provides the next generation of scholars with new scholarship and opportunities of leadership.
  • Attendees hear well-researched papers and others further their career by presenting a paper.
  • The conference deals with urgent issues within academia.
  • It creates the opportunity for intergenerational discussions.
  • Allows academic administrators to see the creative and scholarly work that many educators create each year.
  • Opens the door to new forms of knowledge production.
  • Creates opportunities that can only happen face-to-face — a sense of connection and belonging to the field.
  • The sense of critical mass is really important.
  • Allows for a reunion of friends and colleagues, which helps with professional opportunities.
  • Challenges and energizes educators in their job – a mini-sabbatical.

Register for the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February 21-24.

REGISTER NOW

As we think about changes for the future we are focusing on:

  • A higher percentage of the membership that can participate/attend the Annual Conference.
  • Creating a physical/digital memory of the conference via social media.
  • On-site exhibitions for visual artists.
  • Increased profile of our field in general audience media.
  • More social media and blogging about the conference.
  • Offering more opportunities for dealing with practical family issues during the conference (i.e., child/adult care, etc.)
Filed under: CAA News

CAA’s Nominating Committee met in early October 2017 to review the candidates who have applied to run in CAA’s Board of Directors election for the term 2018-2022. The Nominating Committee selected the following six candidates, four of whom will be elected to Board service. In the coming weeks, CAA will post their full biographies for consideration by the CAA membership.

Laura Anderson Barbata is a practicing, trans-disciplinary artist living and working in Brooklyn and Mexico City. Her work is intended to connect various cultures through the platform of contemporary art. Her art engages creative practices that promote dignity, shared values, diversity, and collaboration through reciprocal exchange of knowledge.  Among many unique projects, she has worked with the Yanomami of the Venezuela Amazon to document their oral history, overseen collaborative work with stilt dancing groups from Trinidad and Tobago, Brooklyn and Oaxaca and directed a 10-year effort to repatriate the remains of a Mexican Opera Singer. Ms. Barbata has extensive business expertise, as director of image and concept designer for a chain of 50 restaurants throughout Mexico. She was Vice President of the company and worked to protect the interests of the shareholders until the business was sold. Ms. Barbata feels she offers a unique perspective – having international business experience as well as maintaining a career as an artist.

Audrey G. Bennett is a full professor in the Department of Communication and Media, and director of the interdisciplinary graduate program in Communication and Rhetoric at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  She was a 1996 recipient of a CAA Professional Development Fellowship and is currently a member of CAA’s Inaugural Committee on Design. From 2002-2010 she was a member of the Board of the Upstate New York chapter of the AIGA, the professional association for design where she served in a number of leadership roles. She is a former 2015 Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Scholar, University of Pretoria, South Africa. Prof. Bennett secured funding for and founded the Global Interaction in Design Education (GLIDE), a biennial, virtual design conference. She would like to assist CAA in diversifying its membership culturally and intellectually.

Dahlia Elsayed is an Associate Professor of Fine Arts in the Humanities Dept. at CUNY-LaGuardia Community College. She is a practicing artist who combines text and imagery to create visually narrative paintings that document internal and external geographies. Her work is influenced by conceptual art, comics and landscape painting and cartography.  She is particularly interested in attracting and welcoming the vital constituency of community college faculty and students to CAA.  Furthermore she sees opportunities to facilitate interactions between community colleges, senior colleges and graduate programs to strengthen best practices and continuity.

Alice Ming Wai Jim is Associate Professor in Contemporary Art and Concordia University Research Chair in Ethnocultural Art Histories at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. She is the founding co-editor of the international scholarly journal, “Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas.” Alice is an art historian, curator and cultural organizer in the fields of diasporic and global art histories, media arts and curatorial studies. Focusing on Asian Canadian and African Canadian artists, she has curated exhibitions of over fifty artists of color and Indigenous artists and organized major scholarly events within academic settings and for the broader arts community in Canada and internationally. She is also involved in a leadership capacity in several formal partnerships involving international networking and community building initiatives, with a strong commitment to research and social justice. Alice would like to work toward increasing the visibility of members from diverse cultural communities, strengthening international exchanges, and expanding critical capacities for art historical scholarship and critical visual culture studies on and by ethnic minority and Indigenous peoples across the Americas and internationally.

Richard Lubben is Dean of the Arts Division at Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon.  He is a painter, whose recent work consists of a series of large format abstract oil paintings examining visual transitions of landscapes through seasonal changes, memories of nature and delicate ecosystems. He was awarded a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Human Rights and Social Justice at the University of Ottawa in 2013. He has served on CAA’s Task Force on Advocacy, been on panels at CAA’s Annual Conference and is currently the Chair of CAA’s Education Committee.  Lubben urges the inclusion of representatives from community colleges on CAA’s board but even more importantly attracting to CAA the thousands of 2-year institutional members, and potential individual members, associated with the nearly 1500 community colleges across the United States.

Walter Meyer, Professor of Art History at Santa Monica College, a 2-year community college  in California.  His degree is early 20th century art, specializing in Eastern Europe and Russia.  He has taken on a number of leadership positions at SMC including co-chairing the Technology Planning Committee . He is President of the Art Historians of Southern California, and former board member of the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles. Currently, he serves on CAA’s Professional Practices Committee. Meyer believes in the mission of the community college system and its ability to help art and art history programs close the equity gap with under-represented populations on college campuses.

Filed under: Board of Directors

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by CAA — Nov 08, 2017

Barbara Kruger installation as part of Performa 17, November 2017. Photo: Scott Heins/Gothamist

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Latinx Community Activism and Social Art Practices Get A Rare Spotlight in New Exhibit

Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas is now on view in Los Angeles. (KCET)

Me and My Pencil: Famous Creatives on their Tools – in Pictures

Alex Hammond and Mike Tinney photographed the pencils of 70 artists, designers, musicians and architects. (The Guardian)

The Angriest Librarian Is Full of Hope

After his profanity-laced tweetstorm went viral, Portland librarian Alex Halpern found himself speaking up for his embattled profession. (CityLab)

The Women Who Built the New York Art World

Between 1929 and 1939, four of New York City’s most iconic museums emerged in Manhattan. (Artsy)

Photos: Barbara Kruger’s Bold Statement Pieces Now Up Around NYC

The artist has taken over several spaces in NYC this month as part of the Performa Biennial. (Gothamist)

Galleries Hit by Cyber Crime Wave

Hackers are using an email scam to intercept payments between galleries, collectors and others. (The Art Newspaper)

How to Frame a $100 Million Painting by Leonardo da Vinci

“When you see it with no barrier between you and the actual piece, it’s stunning.” (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

Annual Conference Committee Seeks Members

posted by CAA — Nov 07, 2017

CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for at-large members of the Annual Conference Committee to serve a three-year term and for New York Regional Representatives to serve a one-year term. Terms begin February 2018, immediately following the 106th Annual Conference.

Working with the Programs and Publications Department staff, this committee reads and reviews proposals and selects sessions for the Annual Conference. The committee ensures that the program reflects the goals of the association and of the Annual Conference, namely, to make the conference an effective place for intellectual, aesthetic, and professional learning and exchange, and to provide opportunities for participation that are fair, equal, and balanced.

The Annual Conference Committee meets at least three times a year via conference call, once during the Annual Conference, and at the call of the program chair and vice president for Annual Conference. Committee members must be available throughout May and June to review a significant amount of material and select conference content from the submitted proposals.

Please send a 150-word letter of interest and a CV to Michelle Stanek, CAA manager of annual conference. Deadline: January 15, 2018

Filed under: Annual Conference

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

This week, Molly Sherman, Assistant Professor in Communication Design at Texas State University, and Kate Bingaman-Burt, Associate Professor of Graphic Design at Portland State University, discuss design and community engagement.

Filed under: CAA Conversations

New in caa.reviews

posted by CAA — Nov 03, 2017

  

Anne Mahady-Kneller discusses Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist edited by Richard J. Powell. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Zeynep Kezer reviews Architecture and the Late Ottoman Historical Imaginary: Reconfiguring the Architectural Past in a Modernizing Empire by Ahmet A. Ersoy. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Ellen Shortell reads Villard de Honnecourt: Architecte du XIIIe siècle by Jean Wirth. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

Refining Hiring Standards for Part-Time Faculty

posted by CAA — Nov 02, 2017

Students and faculty protest at Ithaca College, 2016. Image courtesy Tompkins County Workers’ Center.

CAA is committed to supporting all professionals in the field.  This especially pertains to those who are applying for and working as part-time faculty members.  For more than twenty years, CAA has been setting standards for hiring part-time faculty.

CAA’s current guidelines are published here and copied below. We want to hear from members about how these might be updated and strengthened.

Hunter O’Hanian
College Art Association
Executive  Director and Chief Executive Officer

CAA Guidelines for Part-Time Professional Employment

Part-time employees play a critical role within the art world, specifically in academia, museums, galleries, and other arts institutions. They help meet curricular demands, offer expertise in specialized areas, and/or provide leadership in institutional programming.

Part-time faculty may be referred to with the following terms: adjunct, temporary, lecturer, graduate assistant, and teaching assistant. The terminology and its implications may vary from institution to institution, with the designation “part-time” or “temporary” serving as the most general and therefore consistent names. While this standard is primarily concerned with addressing the conditions of fully credentialed and professionalized part-time or short-term employees who are not simultaneously graduate students, this guideline may be relevant to those employed in conjunction with their graduate studies.

Part-time/temporary faculty and other part-time/temporary employees may be understood to be of several types: Part-time/temporary employees who would prefer full-time positions, part-time/temporary employees with no other employment, part-time employees who teach/work in addition to other full-time employment, and part-time/temporary employees who are retirees. Additionally, some institutions have paid, professional visitors that are not ongoing, full-time employees and also are not recurring, part-time employees. With this in mind, it is acknowledged that there is no singular reason one seeks part-time employment, and while each person may have individual reasons and needs, CAA encourages institutions to chart a path of continual improvements and aspire to provide the best possible working conditions for all part-time/temporary professionals, especially given the increasing reliance on such professionals.

Among key areas of concern are: equitable compensation; employment stability; access to employee benefits, including health care; access to professional development; and safe and adequate working conditions.

Within academia, these areas of concern may be assessed and addressed by comparing part-time faculty roles against full-time tenured/tenure-track faculty roles. Where similar work is performed and similar institutional expectations are held, equitable compensation and resources should exist. Where the treatment of employees in full- and part-time categories is dissimilar, the differences in expectations/compensation and the reasons for those differences should be articulated to both groups.

Institutions that regularly have visiting or guest faculty or curators should define how such roles are similar and different from other full-time and part-time employee roles. If the visiting appointment has responsibilities most similar to a comparable full-time position, the compensation should resemble such a full-time position.

Certain rights and responsibilities should be consistent regardless of one’s employment category. For example, academic freedom should provide the same protections for all. So too should workers’ compensation and other applicable laws that offer employee safeguards.

Working Conditions for Part-Time Employees

Given the great range of mission and expectations in institutions, it is essential that institutions define the roles of part-time employees and provide them with this information as well as information on their workplaces.

  1. The following written information should be provided by the institution at the time of employment.
    • Institutions with a significant number of part-time employees may wish to create and use a part-time employee handbook.
    • Statement on the institutional/departmental mission or philosophy
    • A full description of the part-time position, including a definition of the role and duties (in the case of faculty, this would include class title, description, size, contact hours, advising responsibilities, and any other responsibilities)
    • Description of teaching facilities, office facilities, and support services
    • In the case of art and design faculty, description of and access to studio facilities or teaching and for personal, professional development
    • Description of financial support and resources available for performing the work and for personal, professional development
    • Information on evaluation and promotion procedures
    • Information on employment security
    • Information on institutional governance and opportunities to participate in it
    • Information on any and all institutional expectations
  2. A written contract for part-time employment should explicitly state the following:
    • Compensation including salary, benefits, and any other compensation
    • Duties and responsibilities
    • Duration of employment
    • Process and timing of evaluation
    • Availability and timing of contract renewal
  1. For part-time/temporary faculty:The standards of excellence defined by visual arts programs should be founded upon realistic criteria
    • Generally, part-time/temporary faculty do not have research/creative activity duties; if such expectations exist they should be stated in the contract and the faculty member compensated for them
    • Part-time/temporary faculty may or may not have service obligations; if service duties are assigned, the faculty member should be compensated for them
    • Institutional expectations should take into consideration changes in academia, the commercial
      marketplace, and the discipline in question
    • Whenever possible, faculty should be included in the design of the course taught
    • If a course is to be canceled due to under-enrollment or another issue, the faculty member should be notified in a timely manner; if it is canceled at the last minute, the faculty member should be compensated, either in full or on a pro-rated basis for course preparation
    • Part-time faculty should have access to private (or shared with the expectation
      of privacy when needed) office space for student/teacher meetings
    • If a part-time faculty member’s institutional contribution is equivalent to that of a full-time faculty member, the part-time faculty member should be equitably compensated in comparison to such a full-time faculty member. If there is no expectation for research or service, differential compensation may be significant. This should be clearly stated in contractual materials.
  2. For all part-time employees:
    • Personal and environmental safety should be a major concern with adequate protection provided by the employer
    • OSHA, EPA, and other relevant standards should be followed
    • Institutional practices for ensuring safety should be clearly communicated
    • Opportunities for advancement in rank, salary, and responsibilities should be given to recurring, part-time employees.
    • Adequate administrative support should be provided: mailbox; office space; telephone and computer access; clerical support; library facilities; and teaching/research support such as assistants and/or graders, when warranted
    • When additional duties are offered or assigned, and such duties are ones often performed by full-time employees and go beyond the regular scope of part-time employment, the part-time employee should be offered additional and adequate compensation, such as a stipend

The 2013 ad-hoc committee for revision was co-chaired by Thomas Berding, Michigan State University and John Richardson, Wayne State University. The committee included Janet Casey, Skidmore College; Zoe Darling, Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design; Jim Hopfensperger, Western Michigan University; David LaPalombara, Ohio University; Dennis Nawrocki, Wayne State University; and Kate Wagle, University of Oregon.

Click here for more information.

New Essay by Anna Craycroft on Art Journal Open

posted by CAA — Nov 02, 2017

In “To Listen,” a new essay on Art Journal Open, artist Anna Craycroft considers the role of the voice of the artist and reflects on her process of creating her exhibition Tuning the Room (Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, January 28–April 16, 2017) in relationship to her research into the archives of photographer Berenice Abbott for Craycroft’s exhibition The Earth Is a Magnet (Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, November 16, 2016–March 26, 2017).

Visit Art Journal Open to read “To Listen.”

Anna Craycroft, Tuning the Room in Variable Frequencies, 2017, vinyl chrome murals, dimensions variable, and aluminum benches, 120 x 18 x 18 in. (304.8 x 45.7 x 45.7 cm) (artwork © Anna Craycroft; photograph provided by Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design)

 

Filed under: AJO

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by CAA — Nov 01, 2017

Linda Nochlin. Photo: Adam Husted

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Linda Nochlin, Trailblazing Feminist Art Historian, Dies at 86

The pioneering art historian and longtime CAA member passed away this week. (ARTnews)

Over 1,800 Artists and Art Workers Sign Letter against Sexual Harassment

The public letter criticizes “an art world that upholds inherited power structures at the cost of ethical behavior.” (Hyperallergic)

“K Is for Kahlo, B Is for Basquiat”: New Children’s Book Teaches Kids about Artists

An inclusive, educational alphabet book by Dr. Tamara Pizzoli. (Afropunk)

Want to Be an Artist-in-Residence at New York City’s Department of Corrections? Now’s Your Chance

NYC has rolled out 3 new artist-in-residency programs in partnership with city agencies. (Artnet News)

The US Cities with the Highest Concentrations of Working Artists

The vast majority of working artists live in urban areas. (Quartz)

How Many “Lost” Masterpieces Are Already Hanging in Museums?

A potential golden age for finding artworks in public collections that have long been overlooked. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News