College Art Association

CAA News Today

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by June 13, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Marina Berio, chair of the general studies in photography program at the International Center of Photography in New York, has won a 2017 fellowship in photography from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Noga Bernstein, a doctoral student in art history at Stony Brook University, State University of New York, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her dissertation topic is “Global Age Design: Ruth Reeves and Cross-Cultural Practice.”

Elizabeth Buhe, a doctoral candidate in art history at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been awarded a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies for her dissertation examining Sam Francis and midcentury abstract painting, titled “Sam Francis: Functional Abstraction.”

Jennifer Chuong, a PhD student in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue work on “Surface Experiments in Early America.”

Leslie Cozzi, curatorial associate for the Hammer Museum at the University of California, Los Angeles, has won the 2017–18 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize in modern Italian studies. During her time at the American Academy in Rome, she will work on “Fra: Relation and Collaboration in Contemporary Italian Art.”

Lisa Deleonardis, Austen-Stokes Professor in the Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, has received the 2017–18 Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize in historic preservation and conservation. At the American Academy in Rome, she will continue work on “A Transatlantic Response to Worlds That Shake: Jesuit Contributions to Anti-Seismic Building Design in Early Modern Italy and Peru.”

Cécile Fromont, assistant professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has won a 2017–18 Rome Prize in Renaissance and early modern studies from the American Academy in Rome. Her project is titled “Images on a Mission: Cross-Cultural Encounters and Visual Mediation in Early Modern Kongo and Angola.”

Jennifer Germann, associate professor in the Department of Art History at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York, has received a 2017 Summer Stipend of $6,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The funds will support “A Study of the Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, an Eighteenth-Century British Artwork.”

Ken Gonzales-Day, professor of art at Scripps College in Claremont, California, has been awarded the 2017 fellowship in the category of photography by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Saisha M. Grayson, a PhD candidate in art history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has been awarded a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art by the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue researching “Cellist, Catalyst, Collaborator: The Work of Charlotte Moorman, 1963–1980.”

Sarah B. H. Hamill, assistant professor of art history at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, has received a 2017 ACLS Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue work on “Surface Matters: Contemporary Photography and the Metaphor of Sculpture.”

Adam Herring, professor of art history in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a 2017 fellowship in fine-arts research from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Margaret Grace Innes, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has earned a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her study is titled “Signs of Labor in the American Photographic Press, 1926–1951.”

Margarita Karasoulas, a doctoral student in art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has accepted a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. The award will help with “Mapping Immigrant New York: Race and Place in Ashcan Visual Culture.”

Marci Kwon, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has received the McNeil Center’s 2017 Zuckerman Prize for best dissertation connecting American history with literature and/or art. The title of her study is “Vernacular Modernism: Joseph Cornell and the Art of Populism.”

Jenna Lucente, assistant professor of visual and performing arts at Salem Community College in Carneys Point, New Jersey, has been commissioned by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority to design twenty-eight large-scale laminated glass panels at the newly opened Arthur Kill Station on the Staten Island Railway. The works, to be permanently installed, will feature a mix of wildlife and landscape scenes that are unique to the area’s geography and community.

Allison Joan Martino, a doctoral student in the history of art at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has earned a 2017 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. She is completing a study called “Stamping History: Stories of Social Change in Ghana’s Adinkra Cloth.”

Christina Michelon, a doctoral candidate in art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. The funds will support her research project, “Interior Impressions: Printed Material in the Nineteenth-Century American Home.”

Laura Morowitz, professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Film at Wagner College in Staten Island, New York, has received a 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend. With the $6,000 funds, she will continue researching “Art Exhibitions in Vienna, Austria, during the Nazi Occupation.”

Christopher J. Nygren, assistant professor of history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, has won a 2017 ACLS Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. His project is titled “Matter and Similitude in Italian Painting and the Transatlantic Renaissance.”

Sun-Young Park, assistant professor of history and art history at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, has won a 2017 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities. She will use the $6,000 award to develop “A History of French Disability Architecture and Design, 1750–1975.”

Bissera V. Pentcheva, professor in the Department of Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has accepted a 2017 fellowship in fine-arts research from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Pentcheva has also won the 2017–18 Millicent Mercer Johnsen Post-Doctoral Rome Prize in medieval studies from the American Academy in Rome for “Animation in Medieval Art.”

Aviva Rahmani has earned a 2017 fellowship for socially engaged art from A Blade of Grass. She will become the inaugural ABOG Fellow for Contemplative Practice and create Blued Trees Symphony in prospective pipeline locations across the United States, in collaboration with scientists and attorneys involved in copyright, environmental policy, and real estate.

Valerie Rousseau, curator of self-taught art and art brut at the American Folk Art Museum in New York, has received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize and create broad online access to the Henry Darger Papers.

Margaret Samu, an art historian based in New York, has been awarded a 2017 Franklin Research Grant from the American Philosophical Society. She will use the grant to conduct research in Saint Petersburg and Moscow on art collecting in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Russia.

Carolee Schneemann , an artist based in Hudson Valley, New York, has won the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the fifty-seventh international art exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia – Viva Arte Viva.

Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of art history at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, has received a $6,000 Summer Stipend for 2017 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Her research project is titled “Cosimo de’Medici, Fra Angelico, and the Public Library of San Marco.”

Anne Verplanck, associate professor of American studies at Pennsylvania State University in Harrisburg, has won a 2017 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities. With a $6,000 grant, she will develop “The Business of Art: Transforming the Graphic Arts in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction.”

Oliver M. Wunsch, a PhD student in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has won a 2017 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. His research project is titled “Painting against Time: The Decaying Image in the French Enlightenment.”

People in the News

posted by June 12, 2017

People in the News lists new hires, positions, and promotions in three sections: Academe, Museums and Galleries, and Organizations and Publications.

The section is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Academe

Christine Poggi, formerly professor of art history at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has been named Judy and Michael Steinhardt Director of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

Charles Wright, professor and chair of art at Western Illinois University in Macomb, has become dean of academic affairs at Ferris State University’s Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Museums and Galleries

Wassan Al-Khudhairi, presently curator of modern and contemporary art at the Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama, has become chief curator of the Contemporary Art Museum Saint Louis in Missouri.

Brooke Davis Anderson has been named Edna S. Tuttleman Director of the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia.

Virginia Brilliant, formerly Ulla R. Searing Curator of Collections at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, has been appointed curator-in-charge of European paintings at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in California.

Emma Imbrie Chubb, a doctoral student and presidential fellow in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has been named the inaugural Charlotte Feng Ford ’83 Curator of Contemporary Art at the Smith College Museum of Art in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Sarah Guernsey, formerly vice president for publishing and design at the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been appointed deputy director for curatorial affairs at the museum.

Anna Katz, curatorial fellow at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, in California since 2015, has joined the museum as assistant curator.

Christine Sciacca has become associate curator of European art, 300–1400 CE, at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. She was previously assistant curator in the Manuscripts Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, California.

Organizations and Publications

Yolanda Sánchez has retired from her position in the Fine Arts and Cultural Affairs Division of the Miami-Dade Aviation Department and the art program at Miami International Airport in Florida.

Roger Thorp has left Tate Publishing in London, England, for the position of editorial director at Thames and Hudson, also in London.

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members

posted by June 09, 2017

See when and where CAA members are exhibiting their art, and view images of their work.

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Mid-Atlantic

H. K. Anne. Art Hallway, US Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Virginia, May 2–June 29, 2017. H. K. Anne Presents the American Landscape. Oil painting.

Northeast

Jean Bundy. Pleiades Gallery, New York, May 16–June 10, 2017. Underpinnings: Truth Is Found beneath Surfaces. Painting.

Ellen K. Levy. Mid-Manhattan Library, New York Public Library, New York, April 6–June 28, 2017. Meme Machines. Mixed media.

Michael Rich. Mary Castelnovo Gallery, Providence Art Club, Providence, Rhode Island, June 4–23, 2017. Woodcut collage.

Michael Rich. Imago Foundation for the Arts, Warren, Rhode Island, April 6–May 7, 2017. Collage and painting.

South

Jill Withrow Baker. Pennington Gallery, Ekstrom Library, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, April 11–July 31, 2017. Daughters of Leda Illustrations. Oil painting and drawing.

Kyra Belán. Grand Atrium and Conservatory Galleries, Sydney and Berne Davis Art Center, Fort Myers, Florida, April 1–30, 2017. Kyra Belán: Symbolic Magic. Painting, drawing, and mixed media.

West

Michael Azgour. Hohmann Fine Art, Palm Desert, California, January 14–February 15, 2017. Velocity. Painting.

Serena Bocchino. ArtHaus, San Francisco, California, April 6–June 30, 2017. Painting.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members

posted by June 09, 2017

Check out details on recent shows organized by CAA members who are also curators.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Books Published by CAA Members

posted by June 06, 2017

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Jeffrey Abt. Valuing Detroit’s Art Museum: A History of Fiscal Abandonment and Rescue (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

Matthew BaigellThe Implacable Urge to Defame: Cartoon Jews in the American Press, 1877–1935 (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2017).

Thea BurnsThe “Compositiones variae”: A Late Eighth-Century Craftsman’s Technical Treatise Reconsidered (London: Archetype, 2017).

Kim GrantAll about Process: The Theory and Discourse of Modern Artistic Labor (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2017).

James Housefield. Playing with Earth and Sky: Astronomy, Geography, and the Art of Marcel Duchamp (Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England; Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2016).

Ruth E. Iskin, ed., Re-envisioning the Contemporary Art Canon: Perspectives in a Global World (New York: Routledge, 2017).

Tirza True LatimerEccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016).

Chari PradelFabricating the Tenjukoku Shūchō Mandara and Prince Shōtoku’s Afterlives (Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill, 2016).

Athena TachaVisualizing the Universe: Athena Tacha’s Proposals for Public Art Commissions 1972–2012, ed. Richard E. Spear, introduction by Glenn Harper and Twylene Moyer (Washington, DC: Grayson, 2017).

A scene from the fair-use workshop at the UCLA Library (photograph by Sharon E. Farb)

On May 5, 2017, CAA hosted “Fair Use and the Visual Arts,” a presentation and panel discussion at the UCLA Library. The event was made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Speakers on the panel included Peter Jaszi, the lead investigator on the CAA Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts and Professor at American University Washington College of Law in the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, and Janet Landay, Program Manager of the Fair Use Initiative at CAA. The pair, who have given presentations across the U.S. and internationally as part of the CAA Fair Use Initiative, talked about why it was important for CAA to undertake the project, their methodology, and the resulting Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts.

The second half of the event was devoted to a Q&A with the audience of approximately fifty-five people. Question topics ranged from addressing the issue of how the size at which an illustration is produced impacts fair use to indicating in a caption or illustration credits section that I am claiming fair use in the reproduction of an illustration.

A second discussion on CAA’s Fair Use Initiative took place at the American Alliance of Museum’s 2017 Annual Meeting and MuseumExpo in Saint Louis, Missouri. The panel discussion, titled “Copyrighted Material in the Museum: A Path to Fair Use,” took place on May 9. The panel brought together esteemed colleagues from the museum and publishing worlds and was comprised of Patricia Fidler, publisher of art and architecture at Yale University Press; Anne Collins Goodyear, codirector of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art; Judy Metro, editor in chief for the National Gallery of Art; and Joseph Newland, director of publishing for the Menil Collection. Hunter O’Hanian, CAA executive director, was the chair and moderator.

A presenter at AAM’s annual meeting discussed Andrea Wallace’s Still Life Pixel + Metadata Dress (photograph by Anne Young)

About seventy-five to one hundred people attended the standing-room only session and discussion revolved around fair-use issues for museums who want to use their own materials: catalogues, brochures, websites—even wall texts. A key takeaway from the session: museum representatives need to maintain good relations with donor and lenders, and getting approval from their own legal counsel, who tend to approach these matters with caution.

Later in the day Hunter O’Hanian spoke to faculty and students in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Washington University in Saint Louis.

Learn more about the CAA Fair Use Initiative
Learn more about the 106th CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February 21-24, 2018

The American Academy in Rome has announced the recipients of its 2017–18 fellowships. The following CAA members are among the newest group of talented artists, scholars, writers, and composers chosen by the academy.

  • Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize: Lisa Deleonardis, Austen-Stokes Professor, Department of the History of Art, Johns Hopkins University, “A Transatlantic Response to Worlds That Shake: Jesuit Contributions to Anti-Seismic Building Design in Early Modern Italy and Peru”
  • Millicent Mercer Johnsen Post-Doctoral Rome Prize: Bissera V. Pentcheva, Professor, Department of Art History, Stanford University, “Animation in Medieval Art”
  • Phyllis W. G. Gordan/Lily Auchincloss/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize: Joseph Williams, PhD Candidate, Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, Duke University, “The Practice and Production of Architecture during the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution: The Church of S. Corrado in Moletta (ca. 1185–1303)”
  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize: Leslie Cozzi, Curatorial Associate, Hammer Museum, “Fra: Relation and Collaboration in Contemporary Italian Art”
  • American Academy in Rome—Rome Prize: Cécile Fromont, Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, University of Chicago, “Images on a Mission: Cross-Cultural Encounters and Visual Mediation in Early Modern Kongo and Angola”

For over a century, the American Academy in Rome has awarded the Rome Prize to support innovative and cross-disciplinary work in the arts and humanities. Rome Prize fellowships include a stipend, room and board, and an individual work space at the institute’s eleven-acre campus in Rome.

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Institutional News

posted by April 12, 2017

Read about the latest news from CAA’s institutional members.

Institutional News is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

April 2017

The Kansas City Art Institute in Missouri has accepted a $10 million gift to build a state-of-the-art student residence hall on campus. The visionary gift, made by an anonymous donor via the Greater Kansas City Community Foundation, will be used as the catalyst for a plan to create a new residence hall, dining facility, student services, and studios for academic programs­—all of which will be designed specifically for the contemporary student in art and design.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York announced its adoption of a new policy: all images of public-domain artworks in the museum’s collection are now available for free and unrestricted use. This updated policy uses the Creative Commons Zero designation and updates the Met’s 2014 Open Access for Scholarly Content initiative.

The Newark Museum in Newark, New Jersey, has been awarded a Bank of America Art Conservation Project grant for the conservation of the 1871 oil painting The Arch of Titus by George Peter Alexander Healy, Frederic Edwin Church, and Jervis McEntee. The grant program enables nonprofit museums throughout the world to conserve historically or culturally significant works of art that are in danger of deterioration.

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia has accepted a $350,000 grant from the Connelly Foundation for advancing the museum’s community educational outreach. The new Connelly Foundation Community Education Center, located in the academy’s historic landmark building at 118 North Broad Street, will host many of the academy’s ongoing programs for students, educators, families, and adults and be used for rotating exhibitions of community artwork, giving the school’s diverse audiences a voice within the museum.

The Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library in Winterthur, Delaware, has accepted a new bequest commitment in furniture conservation. The newly endowed position will be named the Elizabeth Terry Seaks Furniture Conservator, in honor of the late mother of Terry G. Seaks, a respected collector and economist who made the position possible.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by April 11, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

April 2017

Anna Arabindan-Kesson, assistant professor of African American studies and of art and archeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has accepted a 2017 ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her project, in partnership with Mia L. Bagneris, is called “Beyond Recovery: Reframing the Dialogues of Early African Diaspora Art and Visual Culture, 1700–1900.”

Mia L. Bagneris, assistant professor of art at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, has won a 2017 ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her project, in partnership with Anna Arabindan-Kesson, is titled “Beyond Recovery: Reframing the Dialogues of Early African Diaspora Art and Visual Culture, 1700–1900.”

Laura Anne Kalba, associate professor of art at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, has earned a 2017 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will be in residence at the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, during the 2018–19 academic year to work on “Currencies: Symbolism and Signification in the Golden Age of Finance Capital.”

Jesse Locker has received the 2016 Helen and Howard R. Marraro Prize in Italian History from the Society for Italian Historical Studies for his book Artemisia Gentileschi: The Language of Painting (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).

Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities at Stanford University in California, has been chosen to deliver the sixty-sixth A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His talks will take place on March 26, April 2, 9, 23, and 30, and May 7, 2017.

Julia B. Rosenbaum, associate professor of art history at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, has received a 2017 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will be in residence at the Charles Warren Center for American History at Harvard University during academic year 2019–20 to work on “Unruly Bodies? Portraying Science and Citizenry in Post–Civil War America.

New in caa.reviews

posted by April 07, 2017

Matthew Hauske reviews Branding the American West: Paintings and Films, 1900–1950, edited by Marian Wardle and Sarah E. Boehme. This “lavishly illustrated exhibition catalogue” provides “a substantive conversation” about “the works and the legends of the Taos Society of Artists.” The book’s “spirit of scholarly collaboration and cross-pollination is perhaps its greatest strength.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Katharine Steidl reads Singular Images, Failed Copies: William Henry Fox Talbot and the Early Photograph by Vered Maimon. The author investigates the artist’s “connection to early photography” and, “with the help of postmodern critical theory . . . questions established genealogies and canonical histories of photography.” The volume is ultimately “highly recommended to Talbot scholars.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Emma Chubb visits She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World, organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The “participating artists are all women” with ties to “the wide expanse of land between Morocco and Iran,” and the exhibition “contributes an important chapter to this history, one that centers on the rich conceptual, formal, and political engagements of these photographers.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

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