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CAA News Today

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 16, 2019

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Teachers on strike marched through Los Angeles on January 14, 2019. Photo: Jenna Schoenefeld, via New York Times

El Museo del Barrio Rescinds Philanthropy Award for Rightwing German Princess

The museum walked back its plan after Latinx scholars voiced their disturbance. (Hyperallergic)

Los Angeles Teachers Strike, Disrupting Classes for 500,000 Students

More than 30,000 Los Angeles public-school teachers are on strike in an effort to receive higher pay, smaller classes, and more support staff. (New York Times)

Creativity-Integrated Art History: A Pedagogical Framework

“At a time when the field of Art History is beginning to ask itself what it really wants students to gain from their classes, creativity should be one of those skills.” (Art History Pedagogy & Practice)

Equity and Inclusion for All? Curator Anuradha Vikram Chronicles Her Path Through LA’s Diversifying Art Scene

CAA board member Anuradha Vikram writes on what achieving real equity in the art world could look like. (ARTnews)

Andy Warhol Foundation Lifts Eight-Year Ban on the Smithsonian

The initial sanctions followed the censorship of a work by David Wojnarowicz in 2010. (Artforum)

Kehinde Wiley: ‘When I First Started Painting Black Women, It Was a Return Home’

“I think the starting point of my work is decidedly empathy.” (The Guardian)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 09, 2019

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Art historian and BBC star Sister Wendy Beckett passed away in December at the age of 88. Photo: Associated Press, via Smithsonian Magazine

The Smithsonian Museums Have Fallen Victim to the Government Shutdown, Closing Until Further Notice

As the lapse in funding continues, all 19 Smithsonian museums in New York and Washington, DC, have been forced to close their doors. (artnet News)

Remembering Sister Wendy Beckett, Beloved Nun Who Made Art Accessible

The famed art historian and BBC star passed away in December at the age of 88. (Smithsonian Magazine)

MLA Awarded Million-Dollar Mellon Grant to Support Teaching at Community Colleges

The grant will allow 144 doctoral students and instructors at community colleges to conduct pedagogical research. (MLA)

Six Big Ideas That Gripped the Art World in 2018, From ‘Platform Capitalism’ to ‘Chthulucene’

Looking back on new terms, concepts, and trends that resonated. (artnet News)

The Invisible Faculty

By not standing up for adjuncts, have tenure-track professors undermined their own power? (Chronicle of Higher Ed)

See Inside the All-Female Conservation Studio Dedicated to Saving Renaissance Treasures From the Ravages of Time

For nearly 30 years, Italian conservators Valeria Merlini and Daniela Storti have worked to restore some of art history’s greatest treasures. (artnet News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 19, 2018

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Hundreds gather in the atrium of the British Museum for an unofficial “Stolen Goods Tour.” Photo by and courtesy of Diana More, via Hyperallergic

National Gallery of Art Chooses First Female Director

Kaywin Feldman, of the Minneapolis Institute of Art, will be the first woman to hold the job in the museum’s 77-year history. (New York Times)

Here Are the 10 Female Artists Over 40 Who Have Won 2018’s $250,000 Anonymous Was a Woman Awards

The awards’ founder, Susan Unterberg, only revealed her identity earlier this year. (artnet News)

Influencers in Higher Education in 2018

See Chronicle‘s list of the people who shaped higher ed (for better or worse) in 2018. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

How-To: Students of Islamic Art Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Explore a thread by UT Austin professor Dr. Stephennie Mulder on how to use a Wikipedia edit-a-thon to teach art history. (Twitter)

How Artists Can Master Dealing with Rejection

Straightforward tips for artists—and everyone, really—to deal with an inevitable part of the creative process. (Artsy)

Hundreds Attend Guerrilla, Activist-Led Tour of Looted Artifacts at the British Museum

The tour featured talks by activists of Australian Aboriginal, Iraqi, Hawaiian, Māori, and Greek Cypriot heritage. (Hyperallergic)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 12, 2018

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Charlotte Prodger, Turner Prize 2018 Winner at Tate Britain © Tate Photography, Jordan Anderson, via The Art Newspaper

‘I Wouldn’t Be Here Were It Not for Public Funding’: Turner Prize-Winner Charlotte Prodger Makes Case for State Support for the Arts

The Glasgow-based artist won the top British art prize for videos that meld Scottish landscapes and queer identity. (The Art Newspaper)

New Gallery Will Be First in a Smithsonian Museum to Focus on US Latino Experience

The Smithsonian will open its first permanent gallery space for Latinx culture in 2021. (Washington Post)

How to Be an Artist

Jerry Saltz offers his 33 rules to take you from “clueless amateur to generational talent (or at least help you live life a little more creatively).” (New York Magazine)

Sculptor Anish Kapoor Forces Gun Group NRA to Cut His Art from Video

The artist filed a copyright infringement lawsuit over the use of his Cloud Gate artwork. (BBC)

What College Presidents Are Paid

Explore executive compensation data for more than 600 private colleges and nearly 250 public universities. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 05, 2018

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Betty Tompkins, Apologia (Artemisia Gentileschi #3), 2018. Courtesy of Betty Tompkins and P.P.O.W, New York, via Artsy

A Whitney Museum Vice Chairman Owns a Manufacturer Supplying Tear Gas at the Border

“I figured Safariland officials probably had connections elsewhere.” (Hyperallergic)

Protesters Rally Against UNC Chapel Hill’s Decision to Reinstate Confederate Statue

Protesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill rallied against the university board’s decision to reinstate Silent Sam, the Confederate monument that was toppled in August. (Artforum)

Betty Tompkins Gives Art History a #MeToo Overhaul

How to dismantle art history, literally and figuratively. (Artsy)

Ambitious VR Experience Restores 7,000 Roman Buildings, Monuments to Their Former Glory

A team of 50 academics and computer experts built the environment over a 22-year period. (Smithsonian Magazine)

Graduate School Can Have Terrible Effects on People’s Mental Health

Graduate students cite the combination of financial and professional pressures as a significant challenge. (The Atlantic)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 28, 2018

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Native Land is a free online tool that seeks to map Indigenous languages, treaties, and territories. Image: Yes Magazine

‘Management Should Be Ashamed’: MoMA PS1 Installers and Maintenance Workers’ Union Protests Pay Rates

The union says the rates its members are paid are below the industry standard. (ARTnews)

This App Can Tell You the Indigenous History of the Land You Live On

Native Land is a free online tool that seeks to map Indigenous languages, treaties, and territories. (Yes Magazine)

Barbara Kruger Revisits a 40-Year-Old Series That’s as Relevant as Ever

The show is an invitation to reflect on what’s changed—and what hasn’t—across American politics since 1978. (Artsy)

Bauhaus Histories Tend to Be Disproportionately Dominated by Male Protagonists

The role of female Bauhauslers in shaping the course of modern design is at last being addressed. (Dezeen)

How Mexican and Chicanx Activism Flourished in 20th-Century Los Angeles

Political art-making and organizing have continued unabated for over a century in Los Angeles, starting with an influential newspaper by two anarchist Mexican brothers. (Hyperallergic)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 21, 2018

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An installation view of Tavares Strachan’s The Encyclopedia of Invisibility, 2018, at the Carnegie International. Photo: Bryan Conley/Carnegie International, via Los Angeles Times

Michael Bloomberg: Why I’m Giving $1.8 Billion for College Financial Aid

The gift to Johns Hopkins University is likely the largest in the history of American higher education, and it has a specific aim. (New York Times)

In ArtReview’s New Power 100, David Zwirner and Kerry James Marshall Rise to the Top, Outranking… the Entire #MeToo Movement?

A look at the magazine’s annual “who’s who” in the contemporary art world. (artnet News)

Task Force Tackles Dearth of Resources for Transgender Museum Professionals

Here are steps you can take right now to be more trans-inclusive. (American Alliance of Museums)

The Coming Wave of Affordable Textbooks

Big changes in textbooks are coming, and libraries will be at the center of them. (Scholarly Kitchen)

The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: Art in the Age of Rising White Supremacy

American culture is embracing a more diverse array of voices and ideas than ever. But it’s also a period of ascendant white supremacy. (LA Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 14, 2018

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Nick Cave in his studio at Facility, his new multidisciplinary art space in Chicago. Photo: Whitten Sabbatini for New York Times

Artist Covertly Hangs #MeToo-Inspired Wall Labels at the Met Museum

Michelle Hartney posted the guerrilla wall labels next to the artwork of Paul Gaugin and Pablo Picasso. (Hyperallergic)

How Ideas Go Viral in Academia

Can great thinking still catch fire in academia? (CU Boulder)

Nick Cave Uses His Capital to Help Aspiring Creators

Nick Cave and partner Bob Faust have created a new 20,000-square-foot multidisciplinary art space in Chicago. (New York Times)

Still a Problem: Images and Art History in 2018

“Too often we are still using poor quality, lifeless images that we project in the classroom with Powerpoint. We think we can do better.” (Smarthistory)

Countering Myths and Misperceptions of Participating in the Arts

The first in a three-post series examining people’s questions about arts experiences and how organizations can help answer them. (Wallace Blog)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 07, 2018

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Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1889. Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection. Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Art Institute of Chicago Is the Latest Museum to Offer Open Access to Thousands of Images in Its Archive

The museum has made 44,313 images available under Creative Commons license. (artnet News)

Remembering an Egyptian Artist Who Was Always Looking East

CAA board member Dahlia Elsayed remembers artist Chant Avedissian, who passed away this week at the age of 67. (Hyperallergic)

Graduate Students’ ‘Fight for $15’

Graduate student assistants across the US are pushing for a minimum living wage. (Inside Higher Ed)

Perspective: Academia Is a Cult

“I escaped a fringe Christian sect when I went to college. Going to grad school felt like joining again.” (Washington Post)

This New Database Aims to Become the World’s Best Resource on the History of Overlooked Women Artists

A Space of Their Own aims to compile the most comprehensive resource to date. (artnet News)

Responding to Misconceptions of Being a Graduate Student

“As a first-generation college student, explaining my day-to-day life as a student was challenging.” (Diverse Education)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by October 31, 2018

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Prior to working at Penn Museum in Philadelphia, Hadi Jasim was an Iraqi translator for the US military. Credit: Courtesy of Thomas Stanley, via PRI

Experts: Federal Policy Change Would Harm Transgender Students

As the Trump administration moves to conservatively define gender under Title IX, there are implications for transgender students on college campuses. (Diverse Education)

This Philadelphia Museum Hired Iraqi and Syrian Refugees as Tour Guides for Its Middle East Gallery

“Being close to your heritage is something that makes you feel like okay, now I’m back. You know, I don’t feel like I’m a stranger [any] more.” (PRI)

Archives of American Art Announces Pivotal Gift from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation

The $5 million gift will be put towards digitizing material on art and artists from historically underrepresented groups. (Art Fix Daily)

Professors Are the Likeliest Mentors for Students, Except Those Who Aren’t White

A recent survey shows just 47% of alumni of color said they’d had a mentor on the faculty, compared with 72% of white graduates. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

The ‘Decolonization’ of the American Museum

Museums are changing how they view themselves. (Washington Post)

A Humanities Degree Is Worth Much More Than You Realize

Enhancing the public’s understanding of how the humanities can help meet the economic, political, and technological challenges of the future is essential. (The Hill)

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