College Art Association

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 17, 2018

MLK Jr. mural at Callowhill and 2nd Avenue, Gift of Life, Philadelphia, 2009. Photo: Camilo José Vergara

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

A Wall Street Giant Makes a $75 Million Bet on Academic Philosophy

The gift appears to be the largest by far to a philosophy department anywhere in the world. (New York Times)

Google App Goes Viral Making an Art Out of Matching Faces to Paintings

The Google Arts & Culture app tapped into the zeitgeist over the weekend, allowing social media users to share their doppelgangers from art history. (NPR)

Artists, Museum Directors, Scholars Voice Concern about Documenta’s Future

An open letter calls for business chief Annette Kulenkampff’s reinstatement and a new budget plan. (The Art Newspaper)

Why These 6 Artists Destroyed Their Own Art

Six stories of artists who chose to destroy their own art, including Michelangelo, Monet, and Georgia O’Keeffe. (Artsy)

The Martin Luther King Jr. Murals of America

Since the 1970s, Camilo José Vergara has documented hand-painted images of the civil rights leader across the US. (Citylab)

Helen Maudsley on How to Read Art: “Learn to Do What the Picture Tells You”

After a career spanning seven decades, the 90-year-old Australian artist expects her audience to put in an effort. (The Guardian)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 10, 2018

Betty Woodman in her studio. The sculptor passed away this week at the age of 87. Photo: Stefano Porcinai, courtesy Salon 94 via artnet News.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Backlash Building against La Salle University over Art Sale

The American Alliance of Museums and the Association of Art Museum Directors condemned a plan by La Salle University to sell 46 artworks from its collection. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

The Met Museum Is Changing Its Pay-As-You-Wish Admission Policy

Beginning March 1, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will charge a mandatory admission fee to visitors who do not live in New York State. (Huffington Post)

Betty Woodman, Visionary Sculptor of Ceramic Vessels, Has Died at 87

Woodman had been working with her chosen medium since her high school years, in the 1940s. (artnet News)

First Center for Empathy and Art Launched in Minneapolis

The center will bring together researchers, artists, historians and philosophers to learn how art museums can promote empathy and understanding. (Smithsonian Magazine)

As Flow of Foreign Students Wanes, US Universities Feel the Sting

The downturn follows a decade of explosive growth in foreign student enrollment. (New York Times)

Why the Magritte Foundation Still Authenticates Work, as Other Foundations Back Away

The Magritte Foundation was founded in 1998 in Brussels to safeguard the work and reputation of the artist. (Artsy)

 

 

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 03, 2018

Tim Rollins and K.O.S. in 1988. Photo: Mary Boone Gallery via ARTnews

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Tim Rollins, Artist and Activist Whose Work Thrived on Collaboration, Dies at 62

Much of Rollins’s work was produced in collaboration with a group known as the Kids of Survival, or K.O.S. (ARTnews)

Art Historian Finds Missing Monet Painting Through a Google Search

Believed to have been missing since 1895, Monet’s painting Effet de Brouillard (1872) will soon go on view. (Hyperallergic)

Saddle Up: 7 Trends in Higher Education Coming in 2018

Lisa M. Rudgers and Julie A. Peterson predict the challenges that higher education will face in the coming year. (Inside Higher Ed)

37 Museums in Southern California Will Be Free on January 28

Institutions including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Pasadena Museum of California Art, and the Craft & Folk Art Museum are participating in the free admission initiative. (Hyperallergic)

A Look Inside Cézanne’s Studio, Through the Eyes of Joel Meyerowitz

A fitting homage to an artist who once wrote, “Painting is first and foremost an optical affair. The stuff of our art is there, in what our eyes are thinking.” (The New Yorker)

Eight of Art History’s Greatest Mysteries—from Stonehenge to Banksy

The study of artworks and objects of visual culture is a tantalizing exercise in unraveling the unknown. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 20, 2017

An MIT student perusing works available through the school’s Student Loan Art Program (courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center, photo by John Kennard)

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

8 US Colleges Lending Their Art Collections to Students

Making art collections available to students has grown in popularity on campuses across the country. (Hyperallergic)

Is Higher Education Really Losing the Public?

New public opinion data suggest that despite significant concerns about prices, most Americans (and many Republicans) believe a postsecondary education is essential. (Inside Higher Ed)

Culture Track ’17 Finds American Definition of Culture Changing

A new study shows the distinction between fine art and pop art becoming blurred, as Benjamin Millepied, 2018 CAA Keynote Speaker Charles Gaines, and other city arts leaders discuss the implications for museums and creators. (The Hollywood Reporter)

On Neuroaesthetics, or the Productive Exercise of Looking at Art

Jonathan Fineberg is director of an emerging art-science PhD program at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. (Hyperallergic)

Documents Reveal How the Berkshire Museum Manipulated Its Board Into Liquidating Its Collection

How does a museum end up deciding to sell off substantially all of its most valuable artworks? (Artnet News)

CEOs Are Going to Art School to Think More Creatively

RISD launched a continuing education program in 2016 aimed at today’s global leaders. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 13, 2017

“The Director and the Pharaoh: How Thomas Hoving Created the Museum Blockbuster.” Photo from Bettmann Archive, via Vulture.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

How Medieval Manuscript Makers Experimented with Graphic Design

Designing English: Graphics on the Medieval Page at the University of Oxford considers how early English manuscripts approached graphic design. (Hyperallergic)

Is Culture in the Americas in Big Trouble? Arts Leaders Say Yes

Takeaways from a recent panel with artist Jordan Casteel, Brooklyn Museum director Anne Pasternak, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston director Bill Arning, and writer and photographer Teju Cole. (Artsy)

Archaeologists Are Using Drones to Map Ancient Venezuelan Rock Art

The Cotúa Island-Orinoco Reflexive Archaeology Project is mapping some of the world’s best-known petroglyphs in unprecedented detail. (Artnet News)

Basel Baby: A Local’s First Journey Into the Madness of Miami Art Week

“When you grow up here, you see Basel as a kind of abstract happening.” (Miami New Times)

Documenting Nostalgia on Route 66

Filmmaker and photographer Phil Donohue shot scenes along the famed US highway to explore what we long for and leave behind. (CityLab) 

The Director and the Pharaoh: How Thomas Hoving Created the Museum Blockbuster

The Treasures of Tutankhamun, which landed at the Metropolitan Museum in 1978 at the end of a six-city American tour, abounded in riches of every kind. (Vulture)

 

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 06, 2017

Pieter de Hooch, Woman Weighing Coins (c. 1664), oil on canvas (image courtesy of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie, property of Kaiser Friedrich Museumsverein), included in Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Academics and Artists Weigh In on Controversial City Monuments

Over 120 academics and artists have urged Mayor Bill de Blasio to remove five public monuments and markers they say celebrate racism. (New York Times)

The High Life of Vermeer and his Contemporaries

An exhibition at the National Gallery of Art reinserts Vermeer into the tradition in which he worked, both demystifying his paintings and lending force to his take on the genre. (Hyperallergic)

Seven of the Met’s Tiniest Masterpieces

From a 19th-century necklace of miniature portraits to an ancient Egyptian scarab, here are seven of the Met’s tiniest works of art. (Artsy)

Teenagers in Maryland Create a Pop-Up Museum to Explain Their Lives and Struggles

The Museum of Contemporary American Teenagers (MoCAT) is scheduled to open today. (Washington Post)

A Whale’s Tale: Longest Painting in North America Restored

A museum has restored the longest painting in North America so it can share the story of American whaling. (Associated Press)

UK Museums’ Right to Charge Image Fees is Called into Question

A campaign for institutions to free up photographs of out-of-copyright works is backed by legal experts. (The Art Newspaper)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 29, 2017

Malick Sidibé, (1978). Courtesy Magnin-A, ©Malick Sidibé, via Artnet News

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Histories of 16th-Century French Art Have Overlooked Manuscript Illumination—Until Now

A new book is fruit of a lifetime’s research by the late Getty curator Myra Orth. (The Art Newspaper)

This New Algorithm Writes Perfect “Artspeak”

Istanbul-based artist Selçuk Artut has developed a tool to explore a familiar art world phenomenon. (Artsy)

Needed: A New Graduate Adviser-Advisee Relationship

How can graduate advisers think strategically about their advisees’ career preparation within the flawed system for PhDs? (Inside Higher Ed)

The Long Ethical Arc of Displaying Human Remains

A look at why museums exhibit Egyptian mummies, but not Native American bones. (Atlas Obscura)

At Colby College, an Honor for a Former Slave

Colby, like many colleges, is grappling with its complicated historical ties to slavery. (The Boston Globe)

Malick Sidibé’s Paris Survey Is an Electrifying Portrait of Mali in the Swinging Sixties

Mali Twist is the largest exhibition of the photographer’s work to date. (Artnet News)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 22, 2017

Salvator Mundi on view at Christie’s. Image: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Why A $450 Million Painting Attributed To Leonardo Da Vinci Worries Art Historians

The artwork has been hotly debated for years, but its sale signals one thing absolutely. (Huffington Post)

Arts Alumni Deeply Engaged in Their Communities

A report released by the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project demonstrates that arts majors – whether they went on to work in the arts or not – continue to strengthen the arts in their local communities. (SNAAP)

Olga Viso, Embattled Leader of Walker Art Center, Steps Down

In a surprise announcement, the Walker said Viso will leave by year end. (The New York Times)

Paying for the Job Search

Fordham’s English department is giving those finishing doctorates $4,500 each. (Inside Higher Ed)

Explore Guernica with a Sprawling Visual Timeline

A website launched by Madrid’s Reina Sofia museum serves as an interactive library. (Hyperallergic)

How Picasso Bled the Women in His Life for Art

“For [Picasso] there are only two kinds of women: goddesses and doormats.” (The Paris Review)

Found: The Last Piece of a Jigsaw Masterpiece by René Magritte

The fourth and final part of a painting ends an 80-year mystery. (Atlas Obscura)

 

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by November 15, 2017

The Pylos Combat Agate. Photo courtesy of Jeff Vanderpool/the University of Cincinnati.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Wu Hung Honored for Helping Create Field of Contemporary Chinese Art History

Meet Wu Hung, one of the creators of the field of contemporary Chinese art history, and the 2018 CAA distinguished scholar. (UChicago News)

Researchers Discover an Ancient Stone Carving So Detailed It Could Alter the Course of Art History

The tiny carving has been dubbed the Pylos Combat Agate. (Artnet News)

Leonardo da Vinci Painting Could Become Most Expensive Work Ever Auctioned—Here’s What You Need to Know

Salvator Mundi has been celebrated as the “greatest artistic rediscovery of the 21st century” by Christie’s. (Artsy)

Berlin Nationalgalerie Prize Nominees Troubled by Focus on Gender and Nationality

The shortlisted artists have expressed concern at the lack of engagement with their work. (The Art Newspaper)

Thousands of Objects Tell of Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence Across the Centuries

A new exhibition at Harvard’s Houghton Library explores the human desire to escape the ordinary. (Hyperallergic)

How Art Is Helping Veterans Overcome PTSD

A recent survey ranked art therapy among the top five most helpful techniques used to treat veterans. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

Why the CAA Annual Conference Matters

posted by November 09, 2017

CAA 105th Annual Conference in New York, 2017. Photo: Ben Fractenberg

At the CAA Board of Director’s meeting in late October, the Board and staff took a detailed look at the Annual Conference and why it matters to the field.

Without question, recent changes like shorter sessions and more diversity have been very popular. In fact, results from our 2017 Annual Conference survey found that 82% of the attendees were satisfied as either presenters or attendees.

As we look at the value that the conference provides members and to the fields of art and design, and art history, here are some thoughts from CAA Board of Directors about the impact of the conference:

  • It provides the next generation of scholars with new scholarship and opportunities of leadership.
  • Attendees hear well-researched papers and others further their career by presenting a paper.
  • The conference deals with urgent issues within academia.
  • It creates the opportunity for intergenerational discussions.
  • Allows academic administrators to see the creative and scholarly work that many educators create each year.
  • Opens the door to new forms of knowledge production.
  • Creates opportunities that can only happen face-to-face — a sense of connection and belonging to the field.
  • The sense of critical mass is really important.
  • Allows for a reunion of friends and colleagues, which helps with professional opportunities.
  • Challenges and energizes educators in their job – a mini-sabbatical.

Register for the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February 21-24.

REGISTER NOW

As we think about changes for the future we are focusing on:

  • A higher percentage of the membership that can participate/attend the Annual Conference.
  • Creating a physical/digital memory of the conference via social media.
  • On-site exhibitions for visual artists.
  • Increased profile of our field in general audience media.
  • More social media and blogging about the conference.
  • Offering more opportunities for dealing with practical family issues during the conference (i.e., child/adult care, etc.)
Filed under: CAA News