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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by July 10, 2019

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Frank Bowling, Elder Sun Benjamin (2018), recently purchased by SFMOMA. Courtesy of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Katherine Du Tiel, via artnet News

SFMOMA Sold a Rothko for $50 Million to Diversify Its Collection. Here’s What They Bought With the Proceeds

Work by Alma Thomas, Lygia Clark, and Mickalene Thomas are among the new additions to the museum’s collection. (artnet News)

Blindsided by a ‘Devastating’ Veto, Alaska’s University System Pleads for a Lifeline

The University of Alaska system—which serves more than 26,000 students—is bracing for a 41% funding cut after Gov. Mike Dunleavy vetoed a $130 million line item in the state’s budget. (New York Times)

Rethinking the “Bigger Is Better” Museum Model

Is it possible to rethink the “grow or die” museum mentality of the 1990s and 2000s? (Hyperallergic)

State of Massachusetts Investigates Reported Racism at the MFA Boston

The Civil Rights division of the Massachusetts attorney general’s office is now investigating. (The Art Newspaper)

Opinion: San Francisco Will Spend $600,000 to Erase History

Last week, the San Francisco school board decided the thirteen murals that make up “The Life of Washington” will be destroyed. (New York Times)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by July 03, 2019

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Capitol Building, Arts Advocacy Day 2019. Photo: Joelle Te Paske

US House Passes Funding Bills with Increased Spending for the NEA and NEH

Great news for arts advocacy! On June 25th, the US House rejected the Trump administration’s budget request to eliminate both the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities by approving $167.5 million in funding for fiscal year 2020. This is an increase for both agencies of $12.5 million over the 2019 funding level of $155 million. The funding increase matches the 2019 Arts Advocacy Day ask, which CAA participated in. The Senate vote will follow after the July 4th recess. (The Hill)

One Museum’s Complicated Attempt to Repatriate a “Benin Bronze”

The RISD Museum has held a Benin bronze head in its collection for 80 years. “No one would have given it up unless under duress,” the curators say. But tracing its provenance and repatriating is no simple matter. (Hyperallergic)

Art Collector Agnes Gund Signs Letter in Support of Wealth Tax

Agnes Gund is one of 19 multimillionaires and billionaires calling for a wealth tax on the “fortunes of the richest one-tenth of the richest 1 percent of Americans—on us.” (ARTnews)

British Doctors May Soon Prescribe Art, Music, Dance, Singing Lessons

“Social prescribing” will enable doctors in the UK to prescribe therapeutic art-based treatments. (Smithsonian)

Ten Proposals for a More Ethical Art History: An Undergraduate Perspective

“Higher education institutions seem to spend a lot of time talking about students, talking to students, asking things of students, but not necessarily talking with or listening to students.” (Material Collective)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 26, 2019

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Installation view of 60 Years at Tate Britain. Photo: Naomi Polonsky for Hyperallergic

POWarts Releases the Results of Its Art-World Salary Survey

the nonprofit POWarts recently released the results of its salary survey comparing compensation levels in the visual arts field at for-profit and nonprofit organizations. (POWarts)

Association of Art Museum Directors Calls for End of Unpaid Internships

While the AAMD resolution may be a small measure in the full context of museum operations, it could lead to helpful consequences for workers getting their start. (ARTnews)

Tate Britain Hangs a Diverse Display of Women Artists Out of Its Permanent Collection

The collection of sixty women artists from the museum’s permanent collection tackles the tricky terrain of museum representation. (Hyperallergic)

Survey: The Impact of Negative Supervisory Behaviors on the Graduate Student Experience

Are you a former graduate student who had negative encounters with supervisors during your studies? Share your experience in this anonymous survey about advisor-graduate student relationships. (via Twitter)

Artists Reflect on How Stonewall Changed Art

On Stonewall’s 50th anniversary, artists, writers, and activists share how that moment affected queer life in New York City, and their own creative practices. (Artsy)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 19, 2019

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Andrea Bowers’s artwork Open Secret at Art Basel. Photo: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

Artist Andrea Bowers Apologizes Over Tone-Deaf #MeToo Piece at Art Basel

“While I believe Bowers’s work is well-intentioned, to use women’s names and stories—and in Helen [Donahue]’s case, photographs of her face—without their consent in a work about consent strikes me as irresponsible at best.” – Deirdre Coyle (The Cut)

Hong Kong Pavilion at Venice Biennale Closes Amid Extradition Bill Protests

Artists and cultural workers have been among the most vocal critics of the draft law. (South China Morning Post)

Petition Filed to Create First Union for Guggenheim Museum Staff

The pay scales of workers at prestigious museums are gaining increasing attention. (New York Times)

Fifteen Young LGBTQ Artists Driving Contemporary Art Forward

Fifteen artists share the ideas behind their work and their most recent artistic endeavors. (Artsy)

Tate Britain Hangs a Diverse Display of Women Artists Out of Its Permanent Collection

The collection of sixty women artists from the museum’s permanent collection tackles the tricky terrain of museum representation. (Hyperallergic)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 12, 2019

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Photo Credit: Fay Fox

Facebook to Meet #WeTheNipple Campaigners Amid Nudity Censorship Row

The company’s announcement comes after a protest outside its New York headquarters, co-organized by the National Coalition Against Censorship and artist Spencer Tunick. CAA is one of over 250 signatories on the NCAC’s open letter to Facebook. (CNN)

‘It’s Helpful to Know All Scales’: Online Spreadsheet Discloses Museum Workers’ Salaries

In a sign of increasing demand for transparency at art institutions, hundreds of arts workers have anonymously shared their salary and employment information in an online spreadsheet. (ARTnews)

Protests at Oberlin Labeled a Bakery Racist. Now, the College Has Been Ordered to Pay $11 Million for Libel.

The verdict comes at a time of heightened scrutiny of free speech on college campuses. (Washington Post)

Stonewall: When Resistance Became Too Loud to Ignore

A look at the exhibitions marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, in conjunction with LGBTQ Pride Month. (New York Times)

Artists in 18 Major US Museums Are 85% White and 87% Male, Study Says

Researchers surveyed the collections of 18 major US museums to quantify the gender, ethnic, and racial composition of the artists represented in their collections. (Hyperallergic)

Biggest Offender in Outsize Debt: Graduate Schools

New data shows that the market for master’s degrees behaves in strange and erratic ways. (New York Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 05, 2019

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Portion of Mary Sully’s The Indian Church (1938-45), on view in Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Collection of Philip J. Deloria.

Native American Women Artists Finally Get Their Due in New Minneapolis Exhibition

Women made ninety percent of the Native American art you see in museums, but you might never know it. (The Art Newspaper)

MFA Bans Two Patrons After Students Of Color Say They Were Subjected To Racist Comments

The incident has sparked a wider conversation about how encyclopedic museums—rooted in European colonialism—can transform into institutions that reflect communities outside their walls. (WBUR)

Related: Racism At The MFA Doesn’t Shock Me. I Grew Up In Boston

Universities Try to Catch up to Their Growing Latinx Populations

Like many US colleges, Indiana University Northwest is seeing a sharp rise in Latinx students—but support for them is lagging. (The Hechinger Report)

Two Transgender Activists Are Getting a Monument in New York

Part of New York City’s effort “to fix a glaring gender gap in public art,” a monument honoring Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera will be erected in Greenwich Village. (New York Times)

Four Years of College, $0 in Debt: How Some Countries Make Higher Education Affordable

Read responses from around the globe. (New York Times)

‘There Were Women Working Then, Too’: How Dia Director Jessica Morgan Is Breaking Open the (Male) Canon of Postwar Art

An interview with director Jessica Morgan on her vision for the Dia Art Foundation’s future. (artnet News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 29, 2019

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Kehinde Wiley, Portrait of Moerai Matuanui, 2019. Courtesy Templon, Paris & Brussels, © 2019 Kehinde Wiley, via artnet News

Artist Kehinde Wiley’s Latest Paintings Are a Progressive Riposte to Paul Gauguin’s Primitivist Portraits of Tahitians

“My job as a looker, as a creator, as a thinker, is to somehow imagine a newness within that bankrupt vocabulary.” (artnet News)

Last-Minute Tenure Threat

A professor’s future at the University of Mississippi was uncertain as the statewide governing board debated his social media record. (Inside Higher Ed)

Decolonizing and Diversifying Are Two Different Things: A Workshop Case Study

A helpful explainer focused on decolonial pedagogical tools, adapted from a CAA 2019 workshop. (Art History Teaching Resources)

Want to Help Struggling College Students? Support the Low-Paid Staff Who Teach Them

A case for why untenured faculty are a 2020 campaign issue. (ThinkProgress)

Craft, Queer Art, and the Canon: Sheila Pepe on Moving Through the Margins

An interview with former CAA board member Sheila Pepe on art, queerness, and craft. (Artspace)

Smarthistory’s Expanding the Renaissance Initiative

A new initiative will work towards art histories that “do not present European art as superior and help to weaken the binary western/non-western paradigm.” (Smarthistory)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 22, 2019

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One of the 13 murals that make up “The Life of Washington” at George Washington High School in San Francisco. Photo: Jim Wilson/New York Times

These High School Murals Depict an Ugly History. Should They Go?

The San Francisco school board will make a decision about the thirteen murals that make up “The Life of Washington” this spring. (New York Times)

Western Museums Have a Surplus of Art by White Men. Now Some Are Selling It Off to Correct Their Historical Biases

The work of three North American museums may offer a blueprint. (artnet News)

CalArts Students Collaborate with Cooper Union Alumni in Their Fight Against Rising Tuition

After CalArts announced a tuition hike in March, students have been participating in a bigger conversation around the transparency and values of arts institutions. (Hyperallergic)

Money, Ethics, Art: Can Museums Police Themselves?

“In the space of barely a year, the very foundations of museums—the money that sustains them, the art that fills them, the decision makers that run them—have been called into question. And there’s no end to questioning in sight.” (New York Times)

How to Build How to Build a College Art Collection on a Budget of Fumes

A great resource from Hudson County Community College, which has grown its collection to over 1,200 artworks since 2006. (RAAMP)

Why Female Artists Have Used the Self-Portrait to Demand Their Place in Art History

Female self-portraiture has changed dramatically over time, but it continues to transgress expectations. (Artsy)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 15, 2019

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Artist NEVE performs at “I wanna be with you everywhere (IWBWYE),” a three-day festival “of, by, and for” disabled artists and writers, via Hyperallergic.

A Georgetown Student Defends the Reparations Referendum

“I have no interest in seeing Georgetown co-opt this referendum as its own contribution.” Last month, Georgetown University undergraduates voted overwhelmingly to tax themselves to create a reparations fund. (The Atlantic)

University of Texas Graduate Students Hold “Grade-In” at UT Tower

Student workers at UT Austin rallied this week to demand better pay and tuition coverage. (KXAN Austin)

Parenting and Labor in the Art World: A Call to Arms

Last month, MoMA PS1 agreed to settle curator and editor Nikki Columbus’s claim of gender, pregnancy, and caregiver discrimination. But what is the larger context of this landmark case? (Hyperallergic)

A Performance Festival by and for Disabled Artists

A look at how arts organizers can move beyond compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and instead embrace “access intimacy.” (Hyperallergic)

This Dealer Fought for African-American Artists for Decades—Now the Market Is Paying Attention

“When I called realtors to try and find a space on 57th Street, most of the realtors hung up. They said, ‘Well, what kind of gallery are you going to have?’ And I said, ‘I have a gallery that shows the work of black artists’—clink.” – Linda Goode Bryant (Artsy)

Three Changes Higher Ed Leaders Should Be Ready to Make

Higher education leaders met with journalists last week at the Education Writers Association’s National Seminar. Here are their top three takeaways. (Education Dive)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 08, 2019

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Works by Swedish painter Hilma af Klint (1862-1944) in the Guggenheim Museum’s Paintings for the Future exhibition. Photo: Johannes Schmitt-Tegge/picture-alliance/dpa/AP

What Can the Museum World Learn From Hilma af Klint?

“I think this shows us that we have narrowed the field of ‘blockbuster’ artists to a very small number of men. But there are other great artists that capture the imagination of the public.” – Helen Molesworth (Slate)

Experts Warn Macron Against Rushing to Rebuild Notre-Dame

More than 1,150 artists, curators, academics, and leading conservators have publicly called on the French president not to rush into reconstruction. (France 24)

US Museum Asks Far-Right German Party to Stop Using Its Painting for an Election Ad

The Clark Art Institute condemned the use of a Jean-Léon Gérôme painting in its collection, but the work is in the public domain. (Hyperallergic)

One of World’s Wealthiest Educational Institutions May Close Its Renowned Press

“The fragile truce surrounding Stanford University Press remains cause for concern, but the scale and rapidity of the mobilization that rose up to defend the press is reason for guarded optimism.” (The Nation)

Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art Launches Digital Archives

The Digital Archives Initiative (DAI) was made possible through partnerships with institutions and artists’ estates worldwide. (Artforum)

Making Monographs Open

A project that aims to slash the cost of producing monographs could help make more of them available to the public for free. But will scholars participate? (Inside Higher Ed)

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