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This Week in caa.reviews

posted by CAA


Marnin Young reflects on Georges Seurat: The Art of Vision, Michelle Foa’s thematic analysis of Seurat’s seascapes, early figure paintings, later figure paintings, and drawings, and describes it “as almost certainly the most important book on Seurat in over a decade.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Derek Burdette reviews Alena Robin’s Las capillas del Vía Crucis de la ciudad de México: Arte, patrocinio y sacralizacón del espacio, a study of the now-dismantled fourteen chapels marking the Stations of the Cross in Mexico City from the late seventeenth to nineteenth centuries, which “attempts to return the chapels to our collective conscious.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Brian Rosa examines two urban political ecology publications focused on water: Matthew Gandy’s The Fabric of Space: Water, Modernity, and the Urban Imagination and Erik Swyngedouw’s Liquid Power: Contested Hydro-Modernities in Twentieth-Century Spain. He applauds them for “expanding the scope and depth of contemporary research into the society-nature nexus, political ecology, and environmental history.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Caa.reviews publishes over 150 reviews each year. Founded in 1998, the site publishes timely scholarly and critical reviews of studies and projects in all areas and periods of art history, visual studies, and the fine arts, providing peer review for the disciplines served by the College Art Association. Publications and projects reviewed include books, articles, exhibitions, conferences, digital scholarship, and other works as appropriate. Read more reviews at caa.reviews.



Filed under: Uncategorized

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by Christopher Howard


Each week CAA News publishes summaries of eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Who Can Afford to Be a Starving Artist?

Take a minute and picture a world in which every adult on the planet is a full-time, professional artist. Arts funding and education are abundant, and folks spend their days in the studios, galleries, stages, pages, screens, and streets creating in collaborative groups or in Zenlike isolation. Would that be a good world to live in? (Read more from Createquity.)

Medieval Scots Used Art the Way We Use Social Media

Medieval Scots once gave each other postcard-sized artworks to forge social bonds, in the same way we post pictures on social media today, according to new research. The “postcards on parchment”—whose painted images included patron saints, the Virgin Mary and child, and highly decorated lettering—revealed status, allegiances, and values among the wealthy classes in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. (Read more from the Scotsman.)

Learn from My Mistakes as a Dean

If you’re reading this, you most likely are either a new dean or you aspire to the job. Perhaps you are about to start your first deanship this summer. Whether you become a dean at your current institution or at a new one, here are a few things to keep in mind—advice entirely based on what I did wrong in my first few years as a dean. (Read more from Vitae.)

Wrap Up Your Dissertation with a Writing Plan

Anyone pursuing a graduate degree has experienced the feeling that a project will go on forever. Writing a dissertation can be, and quite often is, the biggest academic undertaking that many of us have experienced. Grant applications, manuscripts, and literature reviews pale in comparison to the size of the average dissertation, and writing one can be an incredibly intimidating goal. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

How Do I Get My Foot in the Art World?

I’m a recent grad and want to learn more about the art world, so hopefully, one day, I can work in the arts. I didn’t major in art, but I took several art history and art classes and really loved them. I also love going to galleries and museums. Could you give me some suggestions on how to learn more? (Read more from Burnaway.)

Making “Skins” with Fluid Acrylics

An acrylic “skin” is a dry acrylic film that can be made of paint, medium, or a combination of paint and medium, that is not attached to any substrate. While acrylic skins can be made with just about any acrylic medium, gel, paste, or paint, fluid acrylics work particularly well since the consistency allows for easy pouring and spreading onto a casting surface. (Read more from Just Paint.)

Using Computers to Better Understand Art

A new field of research aims to deepen, and even quantify, our understanding of the aesthetic experience. Visual stylometry uses computational and statistical methods to calculate and compare underlying image features in ways humans never could before. Instead of relying only on what our senses perceive, we can use mathematical techniques to discover novel insights into artists and artworks. (Read more from the Conversation.)

Getty Research Portal Grows with a New Design and More Than 100,000 Digitized Volumes

Marking the occasion of its four-year anniversary, the Getty Research Portal has been rebuilt and redesigned, making it easier to explore the digitized literature of art history. The portal is a catalogue providing free access to books and journals made available online by contributing institutions. (Read more from the Getty Iris.)



Filed under: CAA News

The Professional Interests, Practices and Standards (PIPS) committees address critical concerns of CAA’s members set out in the goals of CAA’s Strategic Plan. CAA invites members to apply for service on one of these PIPS committees.

Committee on Diversity Practices

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/diversity

The Committee on Diversity Practices supports the development of global perspectives on art and visual culture. The committee promotes artistic, curatorial, scholarly and institutional practices that deepen appreciation of political and cultural heterogeneity, as educational and professional values. To that end, the committee assesses and evaluates the development and implementation of curricular innovation, new research methods, curatorial and pedagogical strategies, and hiring practices that contribute to the realization of these goals.

Committee on Intellectual Property

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/ip

The Committee on Intellectual Property monitors and interprets copyright legislation for the benefit of CAA’s various constituencies. In so doing, it seeks to offer educational programs and opportunities for discussion and debate in response to copyright legislation that affects educators, scholars, museum professionals, and artists.

Committee on Women in the Arts

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/women

The Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) promotes the scholarly study and recognition of women’s contributions to the visual arts and to critical and art-historical studies; advocates for feminist scholarship and activism in art; develops partnerships with organizations with compatible missions; monitors the status of women in the visual-arts professions; provides historical and current resources on feminist issues; and supports emerging artists and scholars in their careers.

Education Committee

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/education

The Education Committee promotes the visual arts as essential human activity; as a creative Endeavor and subject of cultural and historical inquiry and critical appreciative activity, and encourages excellence in teaching at all levels.  Its focus is on pedagogy at the higher education level in art history, visual culture, studio, aesthetics, and art criticism, and on the interface between arts teaching and learning research and practice.

International Committee

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/international

The International Committee seeks to foster an international community of artists, scholars and critics within CAA; to provide forums in which to exchange ideas and make connections; to encourage engagement with the international student community; to develop relationships between CAA and organizations outside the United States with comparable goals and activities; and to assist the CAA Board of Directors by identifying and recommending advocacy issues that involve CAA and cross national borders.

Museum Committee

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/museum

The Museum Committee provides a bridge between scholars and arts professionals in the academic and museum fields.  It offers a forum for the discussion of issues of mutual interest and promotes museum advocacy issues within CAA.  The committee lends support and mentorship for both seasoned and emerging professionals to protect and interpret the arts within museums.

Professional Practices Committee

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/professional

The Professional Practices Committee responds to specific concerns of the membership in relation to areas such as job placement and recruitment, tenure and promotion procedures, scholarly standards and ethics, studio health and safety, and artists’ practices.  The Professional Practices Committee also oversees CAA’s Standards and Guidelines.

Services to Artists Committee

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/services

The Services to Artists Committee (SAC) was formed by the CAA Board of Directors to seek broader participation by artists and designers in the organization and the Annual Conference.  SAC identifies and addresses concerns facing artists and designers; creates and implements programs and events at the conference and beyond; explores ways to encourage greater participation and leadership in CAA; and identifies ways to establish closer ties with other arts professionals and institutions.  To this end, committee members are responsible for the programming of ARTspace and its related events.

Student and Emerging Professionals Committee

http://www.collegeart.org/committees/student

Established in February 1998, the Student and Emerging Professionals Committee is comprised of CAA members who are students, recent graduates, and experienced arts professionals with the intention of better representing students and emerging professionals within the larger CAA and academic framework.

In the past year the Committee on Diversity continues to address how CAA as an association can positively address diversity awareness, training and implementation and maintains a site for resources on diversity practices: http://www.collegeart.org/diversity/; the Committee on Intellectual Property has organized conference sessions on the new Fair Use Code and maintains a resource cite on intellectual property: http://www.collegeart.org/ip/;  the Committee on Women in the Arts provides CWA Picks: http://www.collegeart.org/committees/picks and supports scholarship on women in the arts; the Education Committee organizes conference panels on issues in education, and in 2017 will examine Teaching Art and Art History to Non-Majors; the International Committee promotes interactions between scholars on a global basis and continues to support the CAA/Getty International Travel program that brings international scholars to the annual conference; the Museum Committee focuses on the history and theory of art museums and academia and has implemented its project—Resources for Academic Art Museum Professionals (RAAMP) supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the Professional Practices Committee updates and develops important guidelines for the profession; Services to Artists Committee plans and organizes ArtSpace at the annual conference that presents prominent artists and designers, discussions on artist/designer concerns from safety in the workplace to professional development; the Student and Emerging Professionals Committee organizes panels related to emerging professionals and holds mentoring and mock job interviews at the conference. All committees are seeking new members with expertise in these areas.

New this year, each PIPS Committee may propose and present one session on a subject related to their committee charge.  If a Committee wishes to propose a second session, that session must be vetted and approved by the Annual Conference Committee.

Committee members serve three-year terms (2017–20), with at least one new member rotating onto a committee each year. Candidates must be current CAA members and possess expertise appropriate to the committee’s work. Members of all committees volunteer their services without compensation. It is expected that once appointed to a committee, a member will involve himself or herself in an active and serious way.

The following vacancies are open for terms beginning in February 2017:

CAA’s president, vice president for committees, and executive director review all candidates in the fall, and announce the appointments after November 1, prior to the Annual Conference. New members are introduced to their committees during their respective business meetings at the conference.

Nominations and self-nominations should include a brief statement (no more than 150 words) describing your qualifications and experience and an abbreviated CV (no more than 2–3 pages). Please send all materials to Vanessa Jalet, CAA executive liaison at vjalet@collegeart.orgDeadline: Friday, September 30, 2016. Kindly enter subject line in email: 2017 PIPS Applicant.



Filed under: Committees, Governance, Service

CAA’s YouTube channel is the home of videos from our Annual Conference, tutorials and presentations on fair use, and content on a variety of other topics. We ask our members “Why are you a CAA Member?” at our 2016 conference. Longtime conference attendees reflect on the impact of their experiences over the years in “In Their Own Words.”

Immerse yourself in social-practice art from our 2016 Distinguished Artists’ Interviews (Joyce Scott with George Ciscle and Rick Lowe with LaToya Ruby Frazier) and watch colleagues and friends honor art historians Richard Powell of Duke University and Linda Nochlin of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

The Cuban artist and activist Tania Bruguera is interviewed by Rachel Weiss, professor of arts administration and policy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. William “Bro” Adams, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, talks with Jane Chu, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts; and Jarl Mohn, president and CEO of National Public Radio, speaks about his personal connection to the arts.

Subscribe to CAA’s YouTube channel to stay up to date on all our videos!



Filed under: Online Resources, Video

New Faces for CAA’s Publications

posted by CAA


The president of the CAA Board of Directors, Suzanne Preston Blier, has confirmed new appointments to the editorial boards of CAA’s three scholarly journals and to the Publications Committee, in consultation with the vice president for publications, Gail Feigenbaum.

The Art Bulletin

A new member-at-large has joined the Art Bulletin Editorial Board. Laura Weigert is an associate professor at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, whose area of specialization is Northern European art of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Her term on the editorial board runs through June 2020.

Art Journal

Three new at-large members have joined the Art Journal Editorial Board. Tatiana E. Flores, associate professor at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, with a joint appointment in the Department of Art History and the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies, specializes in Latin American and contemporary art. She is also active as an independent curator. Amelia G. Jones, a historian and theorist of contemporary art and performance studies, is Robert A. Day Professor of Art and Design and vice dean of critical studies at the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Art and Design in California. Derek Conrad Murray, associate professor of contemporary art and visual culture at the University of California, Santa Cruz, focuses on the junctures of African American and African diasporic art, postblack art and aesthetics, cultural theory, and identity and representation. The term for each new editorial-board member goes through June 2020.

In addition, Tirza T. Latimer, chair of the graduate program in visual and critical studies at California College of the Arts in San Francisco and a member of the Art Journal Editorial Board since 2014, will now serve as its chair. Her term extends through June 2018.

caa.reviews

The caa.reviews Editorial Board welcomes Juliet Bellow, associate professor of art history at American University in Washington, DC, as editor designate for the journal. She will begin a three-year term as editor-in-chief on July 1, 2017. Bellow has been a field editor for books on nineteenth-century art and served on the journal’s editorial board for the past four years. Andrei Pop, associate professor for the Department of Art History and the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has joined the caa.reviews Editorial Board after serving as field editor for books on theory and historiography.

caa.reviews recently added design history as a subject area, and Karen Carter, an associate professor from the Kendall College of Art and Design at Ferris State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, will be the first editor to commission books on the subject. In addition, Iris Moon, visiting assistant professor of architecture at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, has joined the journal’s Council of Field Editors to commission reviews for books on eighteenth-century art. Alpesh Kantilal Patel, assistant professor and director of the MFA program in visual arts at Florida International University in Miami, currently serves as field editor for books on contemporary art.

Publications Committee

Emily Shapiro has joined CAA’s Publications Committee as member-at-large for a term of three years. Shapiro is managing editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, after serving as executive editor for American Art.



News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by Christopher Howard


Each week CAA News publishes summaries of eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Online Platforms Are Not Enough. Artists Need Affordable Space

In 2008, a bunch of friends and I built out and managed a studio space in Brooklyn. We signed a five-year lease, with a three-year option, and hoped for the best. We wanted to make our work and to innovate. This meant taking risks and failing often, and we needed low overhead to make this possible. (Read more from Creativz.)

The Best Intentions: Inside the Wild World of Charity Auctions

Benefit auctions have become about as ubiquitous as art fairs and openings. Charity sales are the primary means by which artists can pack a philanthropic punch, but they can also burden those who donate work with drawbacks and tax disadvantages. People have been questioning the model for years, but these conversations tend to stall in the absence of alternatives. (Read more from ARTnews.)

Against the Crowdfunding Economy

Which people get to live their dreams and which do not? In the art world, as elsewhere, success is often tightly correlated with pedigree and acceptance into elite institutions. And amid the increasing consumption of digital media, the conditions for success have become ever more fraught. (Read more from Jacobin.)

Public Art Piece Uses Augmented Reality to Explore Our Relationship to Technology

Public art has the power to shift not only our perspectives on specific sites, but also our relationship to space and location more generally. The artist Ivan Toth Depeña has created a multilayered public work of art, called Lapse, that considers these themes along with the ways we use technology. (Read more from PSFK.)

Copyright Q&A

The Copyright Alliance asked creators to submit questions about the copyright registration process. Rob Kasunic, director of registration policy and practices at the US Copyright Office, answered a few of them to provide clarity about the process. (Read more from the Copyright Alliance.)

How User-Friendly Are Museum Image Rights?

Display at Your Own Risk is a primarily web-based exhibition that examines the current status of digital cultural heritage and public accessibility to it through the online collections of some of the world’s most physically frequented museums. Spearheaded by Andrea Wallace, Display approaches the task from an internet user’s perspective to see if an institution provides the everyday person with enough information to avoid violating its image rights. (Read more from Hyperallergic.)

Liberal-Arts Majors Have Plenty of Job Prospects, If They Have Some Specific Skills, Too

The knock that liberal-arts graduates have a tough time landing a first job is confirmed by data. Yet a new analysis of help-wanted postings for entry-level jobs suggests that those graduates can improve their prospects by acquiring a small level of proficiency in one of eight specific skill sets, such as social media or data analysis. (Read more from the Chronicle of Higher Education.)

Advice for the Newly Tenured

I would love to share with you the three biggest mistakes that I observe newly tenured faculty members make. If you know what those mistakes are, then you are not only far less likely to make them, but you also have the opportunity to experiment with new ways of thinking and working that will help you to truly enjoy your tenured status. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)



Filed under: CAA News

Do you have a knack for sharing your knowledge with others and are enthusiastic about doing so? CAA seeks active members who are well established in their fields to serve as leaders for 90-minute Professional Development Workshop offerings at the 2017 Annual Conference at the New York Hilton Midtown from February 15-18.

The Annual Conference Committee and Programs Department aims to provide CAA members with re-vamped, affordable, and relevant professional development opportunities for 2017. But we need your help to do it! We encourage your collaboration and we welcome your proposals! Sample titles and/or subjects could run from, “Creating Online Exhibitions” to “Thinking Outside the Tenure Track.”

For more details, requirements, and submissions please visit the submissions page.

Workshop leaders will receive complimentary conference registration, a complimentary ticket to the 2017 Opening Reception, and one year of Premium Level Membership (renewal or upgrade to commence upon current membership’s expiration date) in exchange for their work as a leader.

Deadline for submissions: Monday, July 18, 2016.

For questions and more information please contact Katie Apsey at kapsey@collegeart.org



Filed under: Annual Conference, Workshops

Art History Pedagogy and Practice Now Live on Digital Commons

posted by Michelle Millar Fisher


Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), in partnership with the Office of Library Services at the City University of New York (CUNY), is excited to announce the launch of Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP) on Academic Works’ Digital Commons platform. Published by AHTR, a practitioner-led, open-educational resource for educators who address art history, visual culture, and material culture, AHPP is the first academic journal dedicated to the scholarship of teaching and learning in art history (SoTL-AH). The result of a two-year initiative, AHPP responds to a long-standing need to advance, collect, disseminate, and demonstrate pedagogical research specific to the discipline. The call for papers for the inaugural issue, forthcoming in fall 2016, is available on the AHTR website.

SoTL in Art History

AHPP results from a two-year initiative that sought to examine the ways in which art historians devote time, effort, and energy to classroom teaching, curriculum development, and student engagement. Generously funded by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, AHTR began preliminary research in 2015, which included a field-wide survey conducted by Randi Korn and Associates and a literature review assessing existing pedagogical scholarship in art history. These findings were synthesized in a white paper that demonstrated the need for SoTL-AH to be acknowledged as a legitimate area of intellectual inquiry by the institutions and communities encompassing academic art history. As a peer-reviewed journal devoted to SoTL-AH, AHPP will facilitate this process by providing scholars a forum to share research on pedagogical topics and by encouraging further academic investigation and discourse around teaching and learning in art history.

Art History Teaching Resources

AHPP builds on the success of AHTR as a platform to exchange ideas related to pedagogy in art history. Founded on dual goals to raise the value of the academic labor of teaching and to provide peer support across ranks of tenured, tenure-track, and contingent instructors, AHTR began as a collaboration between Michelle Millar Fisher at the Graduate Center and Karen Shelby at Baruch College in 2011. Fisher, then a graduate teaching fellow with a background in museum education, and Shelby, then assistant professor of art history, organized meetings where colleagues shared teaching materials and experiences. These gatherings suggested potential for a digital forum to connect a wider community of practitioners and gave rise to the arthistoryteachingresources.org website, which launched publicly in 2013.

Since that time, the site has had more than 400,000 hits from over 91,000 educators in K-12, postsecondary institutions, and art museums, and from academic support staff including reference librarians and curriculum designers. AHTR’s administration has similarly expanded to a leadership collective of art historians, ranging in experience from early career scholars to those well established in the field, and an advisory network, assembled for expertise and leadership in art history, museum education, and digital humanities and united by their interest in advancing pedagogical research. The unique relationship between AHPP and AHTR will give scholars access to diverse resources about teaching and learning—including lesson plans and the AHTR Weekly on the OER—as well as peer-reviewed articles published in the journal.

AHPP in Digital Commons

In choosing the Digital Commons platform, AHPP is enthusiastic to extend the relationship with CUNY that was first established when AHTR was born in the Graduate Center’s New Media Lab with support from Baruch Learning and Technology Grants. In keeping with the site’s origins, AHTR also contracted CHIPS, a New York web-development studio known for innovative work with cultural institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History and 82nd and Fifth. CHIPS also redesigned the AHTR website in 2014 and created the AHPP logo.

The editors, editorial collective, and advisory board of AHPP are excited to join CUNY’s Office of Library Services in the broader open-access movement and look forward to the ways in which journal contributions will be used in the fields of SoTL, art history, and beyond. AHPP worked closely with librarians at the Office of Library Services to develop editorial policies and guidelines that are transparent to authors and readers.

AHTR and CAA

Members of the AHTR advisory board have recently collaborated with CAA’s Education Committee. At the 2016 Annual Conference in Washington, DC, Renee McGarry spoke on “Crowdsourcing the Art History Survey: How Communities and Conversations Might Help Shape the Global Survey 3.0” in a session cochaired by Anne R. Norcross, an Education Committee member. In addition, AHTR advisory-board member Kelly Donahue Wallace has been collaborating with the committee’s Denise Baxter, including leading a workshop on SoTL initiatives at next year’s conference in New York.



Filed under: Online Resources, Pedagogy, Teaching

This Week in caa.reviews

posted by CAA


James M. Córdova on sixteenth-century murals in Mexico: Penny Morrill, The Casa del Deán: New World Imagery in a Sixteenth-Century Mexican Mural Cycle.

Lynne Ellsworth Larsen on the relationship between art and language in Yoruba art: Rowland Abiodun, Yoruba Art and Language: Seeking the African in African Art.

Terri Weissman reviews the inaugural exhibition at the new Whitney Museum of American Art, America Is Hard to See.

James Merle Thomas on collaborations between artists and corporations at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art: From the Archives: Art and Technology at LACMA, 1967–1971.



News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by Christopher Howard


Each week CAA News publishes summaries of eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

The Disappearing Humanities Jobs

The arrival of annual reports on the job market in various humanities fields this year left many graduate students depressed about their prospects and professors worried about the futures of their disciplines. This week, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences released several new collections of data that show that these declines, part of a continuing pattern, are far more dramatic when viewed over a longer time frame. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

How Campus Policies Limit Free Speech

Colleges and universities are supposed to be places where freedom of expression flourishes. Sadly, that is not the case. At a recent debate at Yale University, 66 percent of the attendees supported a proposition that “free speech is threatened.” Yet places of higher learning seem more interested in “safe spaces” rather than in freedom of expression. (Read more from the Conversation.)

New White Paper on 3D Scanning and (the Lack of) Copyright

It may come as a surprise, but in many cases 3D scans will not be protected by copyright. This does not mean that scans are not important, but it does mean that people making and distributing scans should understand what rights they do—and do not—have in those scans. (Read more from Shapeways Blog.)

The Conflict around Diversity at AAM

This year’s American Alliance of Museums conference made a significant effort to meaningfully engage with issues of diversity and the inclusion of historically underrepresented populations. Among the most visible gesture was the Alliance Resource Center, which held gatherings and workshops in the MuseumExpo Hall throughout the conference that specifically targetied bias in hiring practices, the politics of unpaid internships, and the mechanics of credentialing. (Read more from Hyperallergic.)

US Senate Committee Submits Private Museum Findings to IRS

In November, the Senate Finance Committee sent a letter to eleven museums set up by collectors asking about their opening hours, attendance figures, and the role of the founders in day-to-day operations. Six months later, the results are in. (Read more from the Art Newspaper.)

Artspeak: On Press Releases

Language binds humanity together. Which language we speak forms our community and identity and ultimately shapes our worldview. I believe language—communication in all forms—is meant to bring us together. What use are my words if you do not understand them? (Read more from Burnaway.)

Why You Weren’t Picked

There are two major downsides to not getting that tenure-track job you applied for. The second one is the less obvious but may be the more pernicious in the long run: no one will tell you why you weren’t chosen. (Read more from the Chronicle of Higher Education.)

How to Avoid Being Misquoted by Journalists

Researchers are often wary of speaking to mainstream media outlets for fear of misrepresentation. There are certainly pressing issues with how journalists simplistically present research findings, but scholars that deliver a clear, on-target message can help to ensure their research doesn’t accidentally get lost in translation. (Read more from Impact Blog.)



Filed under: CAA News

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