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The Annual Conference Committee invites proposals of interest to its members and varied audiences. Submissions that cover the breadth of current thought and research in art and art practice, art and architectural history, theory and criticism, studio art, pedagogical issues, museum and curatorial practice, conservation, design, new media, and developments in technology are encouraged.

To submit a proposal, individuals must be current CAA members. All session participants, including presenters, chairs, moderators, and discussants, must also be current individual CAA members. Please have your CAA Member ID handy as well as the member IDs of any and all participants as this is a required field on the submission form. Please note that institutional member IDs cannot be used to submit proposals. If you are not a current individual member, please renew your membership or join CAA.

All session participants must also register for the conference. Online registration for CAA 2018 will begin October 2, 2017. Early conference registration will end December 15, 2017 and advance conference registration will end on February 7, 2018. Early and advance conference registration fees will not change from CAA 2017, New York.

The Annual Conference Committee will accept the following proposals for review: Complete Sessions, Sessions Soliciting Contributors, and Individual Paper/Project proposals. All sessions will be 90 minutes in length at CAA 2018. Please plan accordingly. For full details on the submission process for the conference, please review the information below and on the individual submission pages.

 

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION TYPES

Session Soliciting Contributors
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 17, 2017

The Session Soliciting Contributors option allows a submission for a full session (90 minutes in length) with yet-to-be identified speakers and papers/projects. If selected, such sessions will be included in the call for participation (CFP) which opens June 30.

 

Individual Paper/Project
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 17, 2017

Individual Paper/Project proposals (15 minutes in presentation length) may be submitted for review. No specific theme is required. The Annual Conference Committee will review and select paper/project proposals based on merit and group approved submissions into Composed Sessions of up to four participants. A liaison from the Annual Conference Committee will be identified for each Composed Session to assist with the format and to help identify a session chair or moderator.

 

Complete Session
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 24, 2017
The Complete Session option allows a submission for a complete panel (90 minutes in length) pre-formed with participants and papers/projects chosen in advance by session chairs. This session requires advance planning and information gathering by the chair(s).

 

Affiliated Societies
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 24, 2017

Each Affiliated Society may submit either one Complete Session proposal (90 minutes in length) pre-formed with participants and papers/projects chosen in advance or one Session Soliciting Contributors proposal (90 minutes in length) to be included in the CFP which opens June 30. A note of approval from the Affiliated Society chair must accompany the submission. This session will be guaranteed and will be identified as an Affiliated Society session in all CAA publications.

Subsequent proposals by Affiliated Society members may be submitted separately by individuals, but are subject to peer review by the Annual Conference Committee and must be submitted via the Complete Session, Session Soliciting Contributors, or Individual Paper/Project submissions forms described above. These submissions are not guaranteed and, if selected, will not be labeled or identified as Affiliated Society sessions in CAA publications.


CAA PIPS Committees

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 24, 2017
CAA PIPS committees may submit either one Complete Session proposal (90 minutes in length) pre-formed with participants and papers/projects chosen in advance or one Session Soliciting Contributors proposal (90 minutes in length) to be included in the CFP which opens June 30. A note of approval from the committee chair must accompany the submission. This session will be identified as a committee session in all CAA publications.

Subsequent proposals by committee members may be submitted separately by individuals, but are subject to peer review by the Annual Conference Committee and must be submitted via the Complete Session, Session Soliciting Contributors, or Individual Paper/Project submissions forms described above. These submissions are not guaranteed and, if selected, will not be labeled or identified as committee sessions in CAA publications.

 

 

GENERAL SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

  • All sessions will be 90 minutes in length at CAA 2018. Please plan accordingly.
  • All session proposals must be completed and submitted online.
  • To submit a proposal, individuals must be current CAA members. All session participants, including presenters, chairs, moderators, and discussants, must also be current individual CAA members. Please have your CAA Member ID handy as well as the member IDs of any and all participants as this is a required field on the submission form. Please note that institutional member IDs cannot be used to submit proposals. If you are not a current member, please renew your membership or join CAA.
  • All session participants must also register for the conference. Online registration for CAA 2018 will begin October 2, 2017. Early conference registration will end December 15, 2017 and advance conference registration will end on February 7, 2018. Early and advance conference registration fees will not change from CAA 2017, New York.
  • CVs are required for panel proposals where the chair and, if applicable, the co-chair are known.
  • Session and paper/project abstracts should be no more than 250 words in length.
  • The accuracy of information entered into the proposal form (e.g. spelling of names, affiliations, titles) is important as it will be pulled directly from this database for conference publications such as Abstracts 2018 and the conference website.
  • The Annual Conference Committee makes its selections solely on the basis of merit and works to create a balanced program. Where proposals overlap, CAA reserves the right to select the most considered version or, in some cases, to suggest a fusion of two or more versions from among the proposals submitted.
  • If their proposals are accepted, CAA members may participate in session panels in consecutive years.
  • For more information about session proposals for the 2018 Annual Conference, please contact Katie Apsey, CAA manager of programs, at 212-392-4405 or Tiffany Dugan, CAA director of programs, at 212-392-4410.

KEY DATES

  • February 27 – Call for Annual Conference session and paper/projects proposals begins
  • Proposal Submission Deadlines for CAA 2018:
    • April 17 – Proposal submission deadline for Sessions Soliciting Contributors
    • April 17 – Proposal submission deadline for Individual Paper/Projects
    • April 24 – Proposal submission deadline for Complete Sessions
    • April 24 – Proposal submission deadline for Affiliated Societies and CAA PIPS Committees
  • May 15 – Call for Professional Development Workshop Proposals begins
  • June 19 – Notifications sent regarding approved sessions for CAA 2018
  • Key dates for approved Sessions Soliciting Contributors included in the Call for Participation (CFP):
    • June 30 – CFP for approved Sessions Soliciting Contributors announced (includes Poster Sessions)
    • August 14 – Paper/Project submission deadline to chairs of Sessions Soliciting Contributors; deadline for Poster Session submissions
    • August 28 – Session chairs send notifications to participants selected from CFP; Poster Session notifications sent
    • September 18 – Deadline for all chairs to submit final abstracts and website listings to CAA
  • October 2 – Online conference registration opens
  • December 15 – Early conference registration closes
  • February 7 – Advance conference registration closes


Filed under: Annual Conference

CAA 2017 Convocation, President’s Address: “Art Matters”

posted by Suzanne Preston Blier, President, the College Art Associatio


Art Matters. Art has always mattered. Whether we are art scholars or artists, critics or designers, gallery goers or museum professionals, art matters to all of us a great deal. Equally importantly, art matters – critically –  to the societies in which we live and work. Fifty years ago  this week (February 14,1967) as Aretha Franklin recorded her soon to become hit song, Respect, and Martin Luther King, Jr. prepared to denounce the Vietnam War in an April 4th New York city religious service, Faith Ringgold was creating her celebrated Black Light series, addressing the impact of race riots and other issues of the era. More recently, in 1990 when South African Apartheid finally ended, and Nelson Mandela and other political prisoners were released from incarceration, the important work of South African artists – black and white, men and women –in bringing inequality and racism into public view began to be broadly acknowledged. Within the last few weeks, the Museum of Modern Art began a project to rehang works by artists from majority-Muslim nations facing travel bans to this country. Art matters.

As the one hundred and fifth College Art Association’s Annual Conference gets underway, it is imperative that we reflect on these and related art issues, on the close connections between art making and activism and the vital roles that artists, art scholars and other professionals play in tackling critical issues of the day, whether it be war, racism, sexism, or other forms of discrimination and ethical derogation. Art Matters. It serves as a vital site not only of engagement and resistance, advocacy and education, problem solving and invention, but also as a vital means of opening up and re-envisioning the world around us. Art matters to us both as individuals and as part of the societies in which we live and work.  In an era of increasing attacks not only on the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, but also on the arts, the importance of CAA as the leading organization that brings together practitioners and scholars within the same broad umbrella is all the more important. CAA offers a unique platform to reengage at the local, national, and international level. The so-called STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) are important, but they do not overshadow the arts and humanities. Indeed, throughout history, each has often enhanced the other.

Arts Matter. Yet I have a confession: there was a key moment in my life when I did not feel this. It was the summer after my Freshman year in college at the University of Vermont. I was working in the Senate when one bleak morning I found myself in tears standing in Dupont Circle watching as Bobby Kennedy’s body arrived here in the hearse after his assassination. Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot a few months earlier. I returned to college that Fall but concluded soon after that art history and studio art were simply not enough. I quit college at the end of that year to join the Peace Corps. It was here, in Africa, where I first realized politics and art were integrally co-joined. Every book I read on African art was worse than the last. The field needed a correction, art history needed a correction, and after my two-year term ended, I returned home to finish my degree and make plans to attend graduate school with a focus on African art.

CAA then, as today, was a big deal. Elation and genuine fear were my initial emotions when my first CAA paper proposal was accepted– on a politically fraught panel addressing Semiotics and Art chaired by Henri Zerner. Much later we would become colleagues. These kinds of connections are part of what makes CAA so important. For me, a timely Art Bulletin article no doubt helped with tenure. But well before then I felt it was important to engage more formally with CAA  – as much for African Art as anything else. It was for that reason that I ran for the CAA Board of Directors – and years later ran a second time. When I was a graduate student, many still believed that Africa had no arts outside of Egypt, and Egypt itself was part of a strange exo-African nether world somewhere between Mesopotamia and Greece. African art, if it was considered art at all, was assumed to be primitive. CAA for me was where the real political work began, through CAA board connections, I and others persuaded the editor at Abrams to drop the “Primitive Art” chapter from Janson’s best-selling History of Art textbook. In due course, African and African diaspora arts, and those who made and studied them, began reshaping not only art departments around the country, but also exhibitions, major journals, book publications and key prizes within CAA and other organizations. It was CAA that played a central and ongoing role in this.

What had begun for me at CAA as an engagement about my field, soon blossomed into other issues – open access to museum collections in publishing for example. When I was a board member initially, one of our group began to work with the Metropolitan Museum to make their art photographs accessible on the web. This effort continued and on February 7th, one week ago, the Metropolitan announced that all images of public-domain works in the Met collection will now be available under Creative Commons. This is a huge step forward that will benefit us all. So too has been CAA’s path-forging efforts on Fair Use one of our most important and indeed revolutionary undertakings, for which I and others already are seeing considerable savings in terms of finances and time.

Art Matters. CAA members working together have achieved important ends. But we can and must do more. Art access inequality is not the only issue to attend to.  Access to quality higher education is a vital concern for both us and our students, as are questions of student loan fees and affordability, along with the ability of professionals in our field to gain a viable living and secure employment in educational and art-linked institutions. I benefitted from my undergraduate training at a then inexpensive public university; my graduate school education would not have been possible without affordable student loans. I could not have written my Ph.D. without a government funded Fulbright fellowship. For me and many others, book projects would not have been completed without an NEH grant or others at tax supported institutions such as CASVA, the Clark, and the Getty. Museum exhibitions funded by both NEA and NEH are critical to what we do, and these same museums bring in billions of dollars in revenue to local cities and towns.

Art matters. And this is where CAA is critical as an organization, focusing with a new sense of urgency not only on the longstanding programs where we have excelled but also speaking out on core issues that are important to all of us – such as diversity, equal access, and sustainability. Social Activism is a key part of CAA’s Strategic Plan now. As we move forward, changes in CAA that are already underway and will become more evident shortly will help make our organization even stronger and more engaged – from the reenergized annual conference, to a far more dynamic web presence, from larger roles for our affiliated societies, to added benefits that will help members in their professional and personal loves. Art Matters. It matters to us. It matters to the communities and broader societies in which we live and work.

Suzanne Preston Blier



Filed under: Annual Conference

New in caa.reviews

posted by CAA


Danny Smith visits Architecture of Life, the inaugural exhibition in the new building of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. Presenting a “sweeping, cacophonous vision,” the show conceives “of architecture as the organizing principle of everything from reality to society and human relationships,” making it “a compelling examination in homemaking.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Kimberly L. Dennis reads Old Women and Art in the Early Modern Italian Domestic Interior by Erin J. Campbell. The author “describes a proliferation of portraits of old women in the second half of the sixteenth century in northern Italy,” arguing “that these portraits served to remind viewers of the duty of old women to model familial and civic virtue.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Dustin London reviews Suzanne P. Hudson’s Robert Ryman: Used Paint. The volume “documents the development of Ryman’s art from the early 1950s to the turn of the century” and “provides a thorough description and analysis of the variety of his approaches to painting.” Hudson “writes with eloquence and perspicuity to bring Ryman’s work to a wider audience on its own terms.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.



Filed under: caa.reviews

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by Christopher Howard


Each week CAA News summarizes eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Popular Domestic Programs Face Ax under First Trump Budget

The White House budget office has drafted a hit list of programs that President Trump could eliminate to trim domestic spending, including longstanding conservative targets like the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Legal Services Corporation, AmeriCorps, and the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities. (Read more from the New York Times.)

Can Only Rich Kids Afford to Work in the Art World?

Two years ago, Naiomy Guerrero left her job in the art world. She hasn’t lost her passion for art and still blogs about it at GalleryGirl.nyc, but as the daughter of two immigrant parents she chose financial stability. Guerrero now works as a financial aid counselor, earning over 50 percent more than she did at her most recent art-related job. (Read more from Artsy.)

Habitat: Moonlighting—Artists’ Side Jobs

Most artists, unless they are selling a lot of work, need a good side job. For some, it’s just a way to pay the rent; for others, it’s a parallel passion. But whether they consider it a temporary solution or a career, a boon to their art or something entirely separate from it, the artists ARTnews interviewed all seem to find satisfaction in what they do for money. (Read more from ARTnews.)

“Our Women Have Always Carved”

On the West Coast, in the rich and diverse world of First Nations art, the master carvers responsible for the totem poles and myriad other monumental works are usually men. There are exceptions. And two exceptional women—trailblazing female First Nations artists who have carved their way into Canadian cultural history—are getting their due in two new exhibitions. (Read more from the Globe and Mail.)

The Red of Painters

For the most part, painters have always loved red, from the Paleolithic period to the most contemporary. Red’s palette offers a variety of shades and favors more diverse and subtle chromatic play than any other color. In red, artists found a means to construct pictorial space, distinguish areas and planes, create accents, produce effects of rhythm and movement, and highlight one figure or another. (Read more from the Paris Review.)

Academic Ethics: Rethinking the Justification of Tenure

Tenure for professors has been under pressure, and even the subject of outright attacks, for a long time. But the pace of the assault has accelerated lately, and there is no more significant canary in the coal mine than events in Wisconsin over the past two years. (Read more from Vitae.)

The Changing Monograph Market

The market for original humanities monographs may be shrinking, according to a report on the output of university presses. After remaining stable from 2009 to 2011, the number of original works in the humanities published by university presses fell both in 2012 and 2013, according to estimates from the two publishing consultants who wrote the report. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

An Activity That Promotes Engagement with Required Readings, Even in Large Classes

Encouraging students to complete the course readings is an age-old problem. On the first day of class, I often say something like this to my students: “Nothing floats my boat more than great discussion. Nothing promotes great discussion like having completed the readings. And nothing promotes completing the readings like having points attached to it.” (Read more from Faculty Focus.)



Filed under: CAA News

Thank You For CAA2017

posted by CAA


Thank you everyone who made this 2017 Annual Conference in New York a lively and vibrant event. The CAA staff, board, and myCAA helpers spoke with as many attendees as we could and attended as many sessions as we could. From what we heard at the conference, through official feedback channels and informal hallway conversations, people had a good time and learned. Attendees felt challenged and invigorated by the discussions. That is all we can ask. We received positive responses to our themes of inclusion, problem solving, and feedback. The shortened ninety-minute sessions were welcomed and attendees shared that the addition of more sessions on diversity and current politics gave the conference a much-needed vitality. For our attendees, we hope that myCAA collectively felt like ourCAA.

We look forward to carrying this energy and momentum into the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February 21-24, 2018.

There will be many, many more images to come in the next few weeks. But here are a few that we wanted to share right away.

Convocation as an Act of Protest

Distinguished Artist for Lifetime Achievement, Faith Ringgold

Distinguished Scholar, Kaja Silverman

Artist Judith Bernstein, a discussant in the Distinguished Artist Interviews

CAA-Getty International Fellow, Richard Gregor

Impromptu Protest Posters

Attendees Singing “We Shall Overcome” Together



Filed under: Annual Conference

CAA announced the results of the 2017 Board of Directors election on Friday, February 17, 2017, during the second half of the Annual Business Meeting. The four new directors are:

They will take office at the next board meeting, in May 2017, and serve four-year terms. Thank you for voting!



News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by Christopher Howard


Each week CAA News summarizes eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Art under Threat in 2016: Presenting the Figures

Freemuse registered 1,028 attacks on artists and violations of their rights in 2016 across 78 countries, continuing a worrying trend of artistic freedom increasingly coming under threat. The number of cases registered in 2016 more than doubled the amount in 2015, increasing by 119 percent, rising from 469 attacks. (Read more from Freemuse.)

What You Need to Know about Hate Speech and Free Speech

Is there any way to curb speech if it discriminates against people’s identity, like race? And when does speech become punishable under the law? Here’s what you need to know about the freedom of speech and dealing with hate speech in the current political climate. (Read more from Teen Vogue.)

We Don’t Pay Visual Artists Properly—That Needs to Change

Jane is a typical artist trying to build and maintain her career. She has had reasonable success with her art thus far but needs to subsidize her income by taking on work as a graphic designer. Now she has decided to return to art school to get university qualifications and commit fully to her professional artistic practice. (Read more from the Guardian.)

Reports of the Death of Religious Art Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

When written in the same sentence, the terms “religion” and “art” tend to turn the contemporary secularized gaze back in time to Renaissance imagery. Those old, redolent, often pious pictures of Christ Child and Madonna are pleasing to look at, but these days their principal function is to confirm how religious art existed in ages past. Present-day artists can’t possibly be interested in that anymore. (Read more from the Los Angeles Review of Books.)

The Prestige Gap

Women earn 60 percent of baccalaureate degrees and 46 percent of doctoral degrees, excluding professional programs, according to 2015 data from the National Science Foundation, yet they’re still underrepresented in many disciplines. Why? A new study points to segregation by gender based on field of study and what it calls program prestige. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

The Importance of Female Friendship in Graduate School

Sometime in high school, when I was sixteen, living in the suburbs, and hopelessly devoted with the latest music, I was asked whether I prefer male or female singers. As I was answering—something about how men sang more interesting songs—it dawned on me: How many female-led bands had I heard? When was the last time a radio station played a song from an all-female band? (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

Metropolitan Museum Puts 375,000 Public-Domain Images in Creative Commons

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has placed 375,000 images of public-domain works in the Creative Commons. This major move by one of the world’s most important museums means that users can now access pictures of many of the Met’s holdings on Wikimedia, and that these images are now subject to free use, with no copyright restrictions. (Read more from ARTnews.)

The Value of Copyright: A Publisher’s Perspective

There is no one view of copyright that fits all publishers. The publisher of a poetry magazine will likely feel differently about aspects of copyright when compared to, say, the publisher of your local phone book. Indeed, even within scholarly publishing there is a range of attitudes toward copyright. (Read more from the Scholarly Kitchen.)



Filed under: CAA News

The Art Bulletin Editorial Board invites nominations and self-nominations for the position of reviews editor for the term July 1, 2018–June 30, 2021 (with service as incoming reviews editor designate 2017–18). The Art Bulletin, published quarterly by CAA, features leading scholarship in the English language in all aspects of art history as practiced in the academy, museums, and other institutions.

Candidates should be art scholars with stature in the field and experience in editing book and/or exhibition reviews; institutional affiliation is not required. Candidates should be published authors of at least one book.

The reviews editor is responsible for commissioning all book and exhibition reviews in The Art Bulletin. He or she selects books and exhibitions for review, commissions reviewers, and determines the appropriate length and character of reviews. The reviews editor also works with authors and CAA’s editorial director in the development and preparation of review manuscripts for publication. He or she is expected to keep abreast of newly published and important books and recent exhibitions in the fields of art history, criticism, theory, visual studies, and museum publishing. This is a three-year term, which includes membership on the Art Bulletin Editorial Board.

The reviews editor attends the three annual meetings of the Art Bulletin Editorial Board—held in the spring and fall by teleconference or in New York, and in February at the CAA Annual Conference—and submits an annual report to CAA’s Board of Directors. CAA may reimburse the reviews editor for travel and lodging expenses for the meetings in New York in accordance with its travel policy, but he or she pays these expenses to attend the annual conference.

Candidates must be current CAA members in good standing and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a statement describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, CV, and at least one letter of recommendation to: Art Bulletin Reviews Editor Search, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents or inquiries to Joe Hannan, CAA editorial director. Deadline: Monday, April 3, 2017. Finalists will be interviewed on the afternoon of Friday, May 5, in New York.



Filed under: Art Bulletin, Publications, Service

CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for three individuals to serve on the Art Bulletin Editorial Board for a four-year term, July 1, 2017–June 30, 2021. The ideal candidate has published substantially in the field and may be an academic, museum-based, or independent scholar; institutional affiliation is not required. The Art Bulletin features leading scholarship in the English language in all aspects of art history as practiced in the academy, museums, and other institutions.

The editorial board advises the Art Bulletin editor-in-chief and assists her or him in seeking authors, articles, and other content for the journal; performs peer review and recommends peer reviewers; may propose new initiatives for the journal; and may support fundraising efforts on the journal’s behalf. Members also assist the editor-in-chief to keep abreast of trends and issues in the field by attending and reporting on sessions at the CAA Annual Conference and other academic conferences, symposia, and events in their fields.

The Art Bulletin Editorial Board meets three times a year, with meetings in the spring and fall plus one at the CAA Annual Conference in February. The spring and fall meetings are currently held by teleconference, but at a later date CAA may reimburse members for travel and lodging expenses for New York meetings in accordance with its travel policy. Members pay travel and lodging expenses to attend the conference in February. Members of all editorial boards volunteer their services to CAA without compensation.

Candidates must be current CAA members in good standing and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Members may not publish their own work in the journal during the term of service. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, and your contact information to: Chair, Art Bulletin Editorial Board, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents or inquiries to Joe Hannan, CAA editorial director. Deadline: April 17, 2017.



Filed under: Art Bulletin, Publications, Service

Live-Streamed Sessions at CAA

posted by CAA


CAA will present six 2017 Annual Conference sessions and events via live stream. The sessions will be streamed via CAA’s YouTube Channel. There is no charge to watch these sessions—they are free and open to the public.

Here is the schedule:

  • Wednesday, February 15, 5:30–7:00 PM: Convocation, the Awards for Distinction presentations, and Mary Miller’s keynote address
  • Thursday, February 16, 10:30 AM–noon: Public Art in the Era of Black Lives Matter
  • Thursday, February 16, 12:15–1:30 PM: Key Conversations: Art Criticism
  • Thursday, February 16, 5:30–7:00 PM: the Distinguished Scholar Session honoring Kaja Silverman
  • Friday, February 17, 3:30–5:30 PM: Artist Interviews: Coco Fusco with Steven Nelson and Katherine Bradford with Judith Bernstein
  • Saturday, February 18, 12:15–1:15 PM: Key Conversations: Hrag Vartanian with Amin Husain and Nitasha Dhillon of Decolonize This Place

Use the hashtags #caa2017 and #myCAA during the entire conference week!



Filed under: Annual Conference

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